Life as a speech pathologist

The profession allows you to work with people throughout their lifespan, from birth to end of life, in a variety of settings. It is so much more than helping improve a child's "r" and "s" sounds and decrease stuttering.  When you choose this major, you will enter a field that allows you to work with: 

  • a premature infant with feeding challenges or decreased hearing acuity in the NICU
  • a child with autism in the play room of their own home 
  • a child in need of aural rehabilitation following a cochlear implant
  • a 2nd grade student struggling with the correct use of pronouns
  • a middle school student having difficulty following social rules
  • a high school student with dyslexia impacting his success in the classroom
  • a college student who suffered a traumatic brain injury from a car accident and struggles with short term memory
  • a business man who learned English as a second language and is pursuing accent reduction therapy to improve his ability to build strong client relationships
  • a teacher and football coach who has developed vocal fold nodules from yelling across the field and now struggles to use his voice effectively in the classroom
  • a man who has his voice box removed because of cancer and must identify a new way to communicate
  • a factory worker who requires hearing aids after years in an environment causing noise induced hearing loss
  • a grandmother who has suffered a stroke and can no longer communicate or swallow foods safely

 

This is just a small sample of some of the types of patients and students who benefit from working with a speech language pathologist or audiologist.  The profession allows you to work with someone throughout their lifespan, from birth to end of life, in a variety of settings

If you are interested in learning more about the dynamic, engaging, and professional world of speech language pathology or audiology, please contact Christina Bender MS CCC/SLP at 419-358-3329 or benderc@bluffton.edu.