Taos Pueblo

pre-16th century

Taos Pueblo is a National Historic Landmark.


Located in a valley of a tributary of the Rio Grande and at an elevation of about 7600 feet, Taos Pueblo is the most northern of the New Mexico Pueblos. For nearly a millennium, the Taos Indians have lived at or near the present site. Constructed of adobe (or sun-dried brick), the Pueblo is the largest multi-storied Pueblo structure in the United States--with a height up to five stories. According to some sources, it is fair to say that architecture began in the United States with the Pueblo cultures.
These communal houses of adobe can be traced back to the 8th-9th centuries. Changes in architectural style occurred with the influence of Spanish colonization, most notably the use of exterior doors and more extensive windows. Earlier walls had been solid except for smoke holes and the dwellings had been reached by hatches in the roof.
 

Details of the dwellings; the baking of bread in domical ovens







Click here to return to index of art historical sites.

Click here to return to index of artists and architects.

Click here to return to chronological index.


© 2000 Mary Ann Sullivan. I have photographed (on site), scanned, and manipulated all the images on these pages. Please feel free to use them for personal or educational purposes. (I would appreciate being told if you find them useful.) They are not available for commercial purposes without my explicit permission.

Page maintained by Mary Ann Sullivan, sullivanm@bluffton.edu