National Museum of Anthropology--page 6

Photographs of works in the museum are arranged based on the museum's organization:

Preclassic Works--page 1
Teotihuacán Culture--page 2 and 3
Toltec Culture--page 4
Mexica Culture--page 5 and 6
Oaxaca/Zapotec examples--page 7
Maya Culture--page 8 and 9

Examples from Mexica Culture



Coatlicue, or "she of the serpent shirt," goddess of the earth and creator of man, patron of life and death

Late Postclassic. Stone, height: 2.57 M

This goddess, mother of gods and of man, is represented as a beheaded figure with two serpent heads coming from her neck and glaring at each other. The face alludes to another of her names, Cihuacóatl, the serpent woman. Her hanging necklace is made of human hearts, two hands, palms outward, and a skull. A mass of intertwined serpents make up her skirt and her belt is two serpents knotted in front. Her hands resemble claws and her feet are like eagle talons, alluding to another of its names, Cuauhcíhuatl or "woman eagle," a bird associated with the sun.
 

A Chac mool (?)

 

Statuettes

Right: This sculpture preserves its polychrome decoration. Symbols allude to fire and water, thus associating the figure with the god Xiuhtecuhtli, although his coloration associates him with Tláloc, the rain god.
 

Statuettes representing gods/goddesses


Continue to page 7 for examples of Oaxaca/Zapotec art.


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© 2004 Mary Ann Sullivan. I have photographed (on site), scanned, and manipulated all the images on these pages. Please feel free to use them for personal or educational purposes. (I would appreciate being told if you find them useful.) They are not available for commercial purposes without my explicit permission.

Page maintained by Mary Ann Sullivan, sullivanm@bluffton.edu