Statues from the Campanile by Andrea and Nino Pisano and by Donatello--page 1 (of 3 pages)







Sixteen statues, four on each side, were originally in niches on the third order of the Campanile. Already considerably damaged by the elements after centuries of weathering, the statues were transferred to the Duomo Museum in 1937.

King Solomon by Andrea Pisano, 1343

This statue was initially located on the west side and then moved to the north side of the Campanile in 1464 to make room for the statues by Donatello. (See next page.) This and the statue below are not statues in the round but are actually very high reliefs, concealed by the fact that they were in niches on the third order of the Campanile. Both Solomon and the Sibyl (below) are figures whose prophesies in the Old Testament were read to refer to Redemption. Both statues are more Gothic than Renaissance in contrast to the later works on the Campanile by Donatello.
 

Erythraean Sibyl by Nino and Andrea Pisano, 1343

Like King Solomon above, this statue of a pagan prophetess, initially located on the west side of the Campanile, was moved to the north side to make room for the statues by Donatello. (See next page.) Like King Solomon, her scroll signifies her status as a prophet.


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© 2006 Mary Ann Sullivan. I have photographed (on site), scanned, and manipulated all the images on these pages. Please feel free to use them for personal or educational purposes. (I would appreciate being told if you find them useful.) They are not available for commercial purposes without my explicit permission.