Success stories

Bluffton mathematics graduates have found positions in business, industry, actuarial mathematics, teaching and graduate school. Others have found careers in other professional positions as diverse as law, music and the pastorate.

Meron Dibia '12
As a Bluffton senior, Meron was selected by the National Computational Science Institute as one of 17 Blue Waters Undergraduate Petascale interns. The 2011-12 internship recipients were chosen from a nation-wide applicant pool of 122 and each received a $5,000 scholarship. Meron attended NCSI's two-week institute of training in high-performance computing at Illinois National Center for Supercomputing Applications. After working full-time with mentor and Bluffton professor Steve Harnish on molecular dynamics simulations at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Meron refined and extended her work in mathematical physics during the 2011-12 academic year. An important component of this internship was interviews with experts in materials science and engineering, mathematical physics and high performance computing in the state and region. This research culminated in Meron s poster presentation at the SC 11 conference in Seattle and a published report in the Journal of Computational Science Education at the completion of the internship in May 2012.
 
Steve Krehbiel '89
A love of computers, science and mathematics has taken Steve Krehbiel to a company that made software for a precursor to the iPad 20 years ago and, now, to a job writing software used by doctors throughout Canada. >>>Steve's Story
 
Will Stemen '63
Mathematics major

Will Stemen 63 and his wife, Karis, had been on several service trips with their church to Swaziland. >>>Will's story
 

Ken Geisinger '60
Mathematics major

The last thing I ever thought I'd major in, following high school, was math. Ken originally though art would be his area and spent one year in an industrial design program at Pratt Institute before realizing art wasn't  for him. "Bluffton gave me a chance after my Army discharge, and Professor Luther Shetler had a way of making math interesting, understandable and enjoyable." >>> Ken's story