Course descriptions

 

ACT 151 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 1 (3)
An introduction to the concepts and uses of financial information, the preparation of financial statements, analysis of the effect of transactions on the financial position of a company and the study of ethics in business situations.

ACT 152 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 2 (3)
A continuation of ACT 151 with an emphasis on the uses of accounting information, an interdisciplinary approach to managerial accounting concepts of planning, controlling and decision-making and the application of ethics. Prerequisite: ACT 151.

ACT 250 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 1 (3)
Development and analysis of accounting theory underlying accepted accounting methods and the method of applying that theory will be covered. Financial reporting focus emphasizes the disclosure requirement in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and the application of ethics. Prerequisites: ACT 152.

ACT 251 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 2 (3)
Continuation of ACT 250 with further study regarding investments, long-term liabilities, taxes, the equity section of the balance sheet, financial statement analysis and the application of ethics. Prerequisite: ACT 250.

ACT 255 COST ACCOUNTING (3)
Emphasizes accounting procedures and principles applicable to the determination of cost of material used, labor employed and overhead expense incurred. Covers analysis and use of the above data in the decision-making process relating to the control of the business firm and the application of ethics. Prerequisite: ACT 152. Offered alternate years.

ACT 320 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)
Accounting Information Systems (AIS) provides students with a comprehensive and practical understanding of integrated accounting software systems. This course will utilize a "hands-on" approach through the use of QuickBooks, a popular software package for small businesses. Students will more deeply explore many of the fundamental accounting concepts, with both a theoretical and practical emphasis, as well as gain a working knowledge of the technical aspects of computerized accounting systems. Prerequisite: ACT 152. Offered alternate years.

ACT 343 INTERMEDIATE MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3)
This course emphasizes theoretical analysis and application of cost accounting systems in business planning, budgeting and decision making, the use of quantitative techniques by management and ethics. Prerequisite: ACT 152. Offered alternate years.

ACT 346 AUDITING (3)
This attestation function is developed with the concepts of audit evidence, materiality and risk analysis and the integration of financial and cost accounting, ethics, accounting theory and information systems into a systematic process of obtaining, evaluating and reporting economic events. Prerequisite: ACT 250. Offered alternate years.

ACT 352 GOVERNMENT AND NOT-FOR-PROFIT ACCOUNTING (3)
Accounting recording and reporting for not-for-profit organizations including state and local governments, colleges and health care. Emphasis is given to the Comparative Annual Financial Report (CAFR) and various funds. Prerequisite: ACT 152. Offered alternate years.

ACT 361 FEDERAL INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING (3)
An introduction to the concepts of the federal tax laws and regulations pertaining to individuals, sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Tax software will be used to complete tax returns. Topics covered in course: introduction to taxation, basic individual taxation, taxation of business and investment-related transactions, partnership taxation, corporate taxation and U.S. taxation of multinational transactions. Prerequisite: ACT 152. Offered alternative years.

ACT 401 ACCOUNTING SEMINAR (3)
This course will explore various concepts and topics previously introduced throughout the accounting curriculum in principles, intermediate and advanced courses. This course will not be an extension of technical accounting issues which have been previously explored. Rather, this course will be a culmination of broader concepts necessary for accounting graduates to become productive employees and professional leaders, both within and without their respective organizations. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 120 and ACT 251.

ART 135 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL ART (3)
This course is designed to provide a basic introduction to visual art for students majoring in other disciplines. Class presentations will include the study of visual art examples: gallery visits, creative engagement projects, video presentations, and critique and response papers.

ART 136 EXPLORING VISUAL ART (3)
This discipline-based course will explore different topics in the visual arts. The course may focus on a particular style, theme, medium, or approach to visual art. The topic will vary according to the instructor of a particular section and the term in which it is offered.

ART 202 DESIGN 1 (3)
Concentration on the theories and use of color, analysis of historical compositions and devices and assigned problems that strengthen the student's ability to compose.

ART 204 DRAWING (3)
A series of problems designed to develop confidence in drawing while examining a number of ways of implying space in a two-dimensional surface. Theory is supported by work in the studio and extended through traditional and contemporary visual references. Students are encouraged to develop a personal approach through the use of a sketchbook.

ART 205 FIGURE DRAWING (3)
Drawing from the human figure in both conventional and imaginative ways using various media, manners of treatment and modes of modeling forms. Discussion and viewing of historical as well as contemporary work expands perspectives and through studio assignments, students develop a personal approach.

ART 207 DESIGN 2 (3)
Theory and practice of the fundamental principles of design as applied to three-dimensional art and crafts. Introduction to and practical experience in a variety of traditional three-dimensional media including clay, wood, metal, fabric and glass. Projects may include clay relief sculpture, functional wood objects, centrifugal casting, stained glass and batik. The understanding and practical experience gained here is intended to prepare the student for more complex three-dimensional art experiences. ART 202 recommended but not required.

ART 213 PAINTING (3)
An introduction to the material and subject possibilities of painting. The emphasis is on construction, composition, paint handling and color. Individual and group criticism, combined with field trips and discussion of painting ideology, expands the students' perspectives of themselves within historical and professional contexts. Prerequisites: ART 202 and ART 204.

ART 214 WATERCOLOR (3)
Specific compositional problems exploring the possibilities of design and expression in watercolor technique. Use of the figure, still-life and landscape as initial references. Offered alternate years.

ART 217 CERAMICS 1 (3)
Introduction to work in clay including hand building techniques, use of the potter's wheel, decorating and glazing methods, kilns and firing processes. Practical experience through participation in all phases of ceramic production. Survey of traditional and contemporary approaches to clay focused on promoting individual student response to the medium.

ART 223 SCULPTURE 1 (3)
Development of three-dimensional form using processes of addition and subtraction. Construction in wood using basic carpentry skills, lamination and joinery. Involves instruction in cutting, welding and brazing metals. Covers stone and wood carving and mixed media assemblage. Survey of historical and contemporary sculpture with special attention to additive and subtractive approaches to media. Prerequisite: ART 207 recommended but not required. ART 223 and ART 233 may be taken in any order. Offered alternate years

ART 225 PRINTMAKING 1 (RELIEF) (3)
An introduction to relief printmaking employing basic relief techniques including linoleum cuts and woodcuts. The initial emphasis is on black and white images executed through studio assignments. Introduction to color reduction block printing. Discussion and viewing of historical as well as contemporary work expand perspectives and the student is encouraged to develop a personal approach. ART 225, ART 226, ART 227 and ART 228 may be taken in any order. Offered every fourth year.

ART 226 PRINTMAKING 2 (INTAGLIO) (3)
Introduction to the medium of intaglio through demonstration. Various methods of making plates, hard and soft ground, drypoint, mezzotint, aquatint and embossment, are explained and demonstrated. Prerequisites: ART 202 and ART 204. ART 225, ART 226, ART 227 and ART 228 may be taken in any order. Offered every fourth year.

ART 227 PRINTMAKING 3 (SILKSCREEN) (3)
Basic techniques in screen printing including direct and indirect stencils. Building and stretching screens as well as darkroom work with enlarger and Kodalith film are demonstrated. Prerequisites: ART 202 and ART 204. ART 225, ART 226, ART 227 and ART 228 may be taken in any order. Offered every fourth year.

ART 228 PRINTMAKING 4 (LITHOGRAPHY) (3)
An introduction to the techniques of direct lithography from stones and metal plates. Various traditions of printmaking and historical contexts are examined. Prerequisites: ART 202 and ART 204. ART 225, ART 226, ART 227 and ART 228 may be taken in any order. Offered every fourth year.

ART 229 PRINTMAKING: ALTERNATIVE DIGITAL PRINT
This course will enable students to investigate a variety of nonstandard means of combining digital imagery and design making with traditional methods, including mixed media, drawing, photography, painting, and collage. Methods utilized include various handmade printing substrates, printing and transfer methods, pre-print alterations, and post-print additions. Experimentation with these methodologies will contribute to the creation of a mature and cohesive body of work by students.

ART 233 SCULPTURE 2 (3)
Development of three-dimensional form using processes of manipulation and substitution. Includes modeling of clay, plaster, wax and Styrofoam with replacement in metal using the lost wax process and other foundry procedures. Mold-making techniques are introduced with further casting in a variety of materials. Survey of historical and contemporary sculpture with special attention to modeling and casting techniques. ART 207 recommended but not required. ART 223 and ART 233 may be taken in any order. Offered every third year.

ART 240 FILM PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
An introduction to photography including camera handling, film exposure and processing, composition, black and white print production and presentation of photographs. Exploration of specialized equipment and techniques. Brief history of photography. Offered alternate years.

ART 242 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
This class will serve as an introduction to basic camera and digital darkroom procedures. Discussion of digital camera functions, lens and digital media selection and usage will lead the student into an understanding of camera usage in a wide variety of shooting circumstances. With a progressively expanding understanding of basic photography the student will have the opportunity to explore the use of Photoshop on the computer to render and print final images. High quality printing as well as placing images as appropriately sized e-mail attachments and on Internet sites will be examined. Field assignments require that the student find creative photographic solutions to problems in form and content.

ART 245 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)
This course provides a thorough investigation of the computer as a primary tool for the graphic designer. Fundamental components of design theory and typography are incorporated with problem definition to provide students with valuable experience in the ideation, research, execution and presentation of projects. Students are introduced to industry standard software tools.

ART 255 GRAPHIC DESIGN I: DESKTOP PUBLISHING (3)
This course is designed to further develop the graphic designer's proficiency in desktop publishing techniques. Emphasis is placed on the integration capabilities of the Adobe Creative Suite. Photoshop and Illustrator materials are brought together with text in InDesign to create custom flyers, trade ads, newsletters, brochures and other communication materials. Class discussion focuses efforts on the technical aspects and aesthetic judgments made in the production of creative assignments. Prerequisite: ART 245, or permission of instructor. ART 255, ART 265 and ART 270 may be taken in any order.

ART 265 GRAPHIC DESIGN II: PHOTO EDITING (3)
This course provides an introduction to digital capturing methods which include digital photography and image scanning. The primary focus for the graphic designer is on photo editing processes centered in the use of Adobe Photoshop. Techniques covered in the course include special photographic effects and custom typographic treatments. Class discussion focuses efforts on the technical aspects and aesthetic judgments made in the production of creative assignments. Prerequisite: ART 245, or permission of instructor. ART 255, ART 265 and ART 270 may be taken in any order.

ART 270 GRAPHIC DESIGN III: ILLUSTRATING (3)
This course is designed to help the graphic designer achieve professional studio results through the use of Adobe Illustrator. Computer drawing techniques are covered in the course along with the use of custom typographic treatments. Topics covered in the class include: editing anchor points and paths, working with layers, painting, using gradient fills, special type effects, importing and masking photographs and using filters. Class discussion focuses efforts on the technical aspects and aesthetic judgments made in the production of creative assignments. Prerequisite: ART 245, or permission of instructor. ART 255, ART 265 and ART 270 may be taken in any order.

ART 275 DIGITAL IMAGING (3)
This course provides an introduction to digital capture, editing, and printing of raster based design elements. Class discussion and critique focuses on concepts and terminology, design elements and principles, in addition to tools and techniques obtained during the production of creative projects. Students will explore raster-based digital manipulation, compositing and imaging techniques including special photographic effects and custom typographic treatments. Prerequisite: ART 245, or permission of instructor.

ART 280 DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION (3)
This course provides an introduction to the process of illustration through raster and vector based design elements, which continues to build on concepts and skills established in ART 245. Students will develop knowledge of the graphic illustration techniques used in professional illustration. Class discussion and critique focuses continued emphasis on concepts and terminology, design elements and principles, in addition to tools and techniques obtained during the production of creative projects. Prerequisite: ART 245, or permission of instructor.

ART 285 DESKTOP PUBLISHING (3)
This course is designed to further develop the graphic designer's proficiency in desktop publishing techniques and theory. Emphasis is placed on the integration capabilities of industry standard software tools and its contemporary practice in graphic design methods. Class discussion and critique focuses continued emphasis on concepts and terminology, design elements and principles, in addition to tools and techniques obtained during the production of creative projects. Raster and vector based elements are organized in layout programs to create flyers, trade ads, newsletters, brochures and other communication materials. Prerequisite: ART 245, or permission of instructor.

ART 295 HISTORY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)
This course surveys the pivotal events and achievements that led to the current state of graphic communication. Students will explore the quest to give form to ideas, traced from the pictographs painted on cave walls to the latest imaginative designs. Through lectures, videotapes, discussions, presentations and research, students are introduced to a collection of influential figures and breakthrough technologies that have shaped the evolution of visual communication.

ART 317 CERAMICS 2 (3)
Advanced ceramic forming and decorating methods are introduced. Students are challenged to refine selected techniques in pursuit of a personal aesthetic in the medium. Clay bodies, glaze chemistry and kiln design are considered with emphasis on their integral role in the creative process. Prerequisite: ART 217 or permission of the instructor.

ART 320 FOUNDATIONS FOR TEACHING VISUAL ARTS (3)
Provides lecture, studio and fieldbased experiences for teaching art in public schools using methods and materials in the public school art program. Involves laboratory experiences in art resources and program planning. Includes a review of studio art development and art education knowledge to identify the student's proficiency for performance as an art teacher. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

ART 327 ART HISTORY 1 (3)
Survey of art history from the prehistoric through medieval periods. Offered every third year.

ART 328 ART HISTORY 2 (3)
Survey of art history from the Renaissance through the 18th century. Offered every third year.

ART 329 ART HISTORY 3 (3)
Survey of 19th- and 20th-century art. Offered every third year. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 120.

ART 342 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 2 (3)
This course will serve as an advanced study of camera hardware and digital darkroom procedures. Discussion of digital camera functions, lens and digital media selection will lead the student into an understanding of camera usage in a wide variety of shooting circumstances. Students will have the opportunity to explore further development of creative ideas and concepts through project-based assignments, enhanced with various masking and compositing techniques. Archival photograph printing and finishing will also be examined. Prerequisite: ART 242 or permission of the instructor.

ART 345 TYPOGRAPHY (3)
The focus of this course includes the basic principles, practices and history of typography and typographic design. Attention is given to the importance of type as both a functional and expressive element in visual communication. Students develop creative projects in order to apply learned typographic fundamentals to visual communication problems. Prerequisite: ART 245.

ART 350 WEB DESIGN (3)
This course concentrates on the design, development, implementation, testing and updating of effective web interfaces based on principles of graphic design. Students will explore a variety of visual, navigational and structural approaches including styles, navigation systems, visual hierarchy, basic animations, image preparation, and file transferring protocols. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual development and structure, interactivity and design aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 245.

ART 360 CORPORATE IDENTIFICATION (3)
Creative, marketing, digital and traditional skills are necessary in this course to meet rigorous conceptual/visual standards pertinent to creating a brand and/or a company's identity. Through complex projects and numerous graphic design formats, major aspects of visual identity are emphasized and developed: logotypes, typographic sets, color palettes, photographic and illustration styles, and appropriate project presentation formats. Prerequisite: ART 202, ART 245, ART 275, ART 280, ART 285.

ART 380 STUDIES IN ART (3)
Studio or art history course dealing with specialized medium or topic. With an appropriate theme, this course may be taken as part of the Women's Studies minor.

ART 385 INTERNSHIP (10 hours maximum)
By arrangement.

ART 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART (1-3)
Supervised individual problems in selected studio areas, art education or art history research for students who show proficiency and marked degree of independence in other course work. May be repeated. Prerequisite: must have prior work in the course area.

ART 400 ART NOW SEMINAR (1)
A survey of contemporary trends in the visual arts through on-site study of the art resources of a major urban area. Visits to museums, galleries, works of public art and architectural landmarks included. Current criticism examined in preparation for the tour with follow-up focusing on individual observations and insights.

ART 405 PORTFOLIO ORGANIZATION AND REVIEW (.5)
Development of a professional portfolio through selection and refinement of previous studio work with emphasis on organization and presentation.

ART 410 SENIOR EXHIBITION (.5)
Graduating Graphic Design majors are required to present an exhibit of their work in their senior year. Students put together a retrospective selection of their best work.

ART 430 ADVANCED STUDIES IN COMPUTER GRAPHIC DESIGN (3)
This seminar course will focus on the development of creative projects based on advanced typography and color theory. Students will achieve development of unique and personal voices through design processes and refinements of typographic detail, contributing to a higher level of design sophistication. Discussion and verbal reflection in a critique setting will further develop student critical thinking.

BIO 135 BOTANY (4)
An introduction to the diversity of organisms belonging to the plant kingdom. Organisms are studied from perspectives of structure, function, evolution, ecology and importance to humans. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: none.

BIO 200 GENETICS (4)
A study of the transmission, structure, and functions of genes. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120, and CEM 221 or permission of instructor. Not open to first-year students without permission.

BIO 205 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4)
A survey of the diversity of invertebrates, from single-celled protozoa to complex insects. Structure, behavior and ecology will receive special focus. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CEM 121. Offered alternate years.

BIO 230 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1 (4)
An introduction to structure and function of cells and tissues. The focus is on skin, bones and muscles, and how people use and maintain them. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CEM 121, PHY 105 or NSC 105. Not open to first-year students.

BIO 231 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 2 (4)
A study of the function and interrelationships of human internal organs. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 230 and CEM 221 or permission of instructor. Not open to first-year students.

BIO 235 CELL CHEMISTRY (4)
A study of cells including structure and function of membranes, structure and function of organelles, metabolism and energy transformations in cells, hereditary molecules, cell division, the cell cycle and cancer. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Cross listed as CEM 235. Prerequisite: CEM 221.

BIO 299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY (credit varies)
By arrangement.

BIO 301 MICROBIOLOGY (4)
A study of microorganisms emphasizing their structure, metabolic processes, genetics, importance as producers of disease, as well as their many useful functions in the biotic community. The lab emphasizes learning how to work with microorganisms. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 235 or CEM 235 or permission of instructor.

BIO 310 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (4)
A study of the mechanisms of development of such animals as sea urchins, frogs, birds and mammals. Organismal and cellular reproduction, intercellular communication, cellular specialization and elaboration of organs and body regions will be analyzed. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 200 or permission of instructor. Offered alternate years.

BIO 330 GENERAL ECOLOGY (4)
A study of the relationship among plants and animals and their interactions with the physical environment. The role of humans in nature and effect on the ecosystem is also emphasized. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 135 and junior or senior standing. Recommended: PHY 211, PHY 212. Offered alternate years.

BIO 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BIOLOGY (1-3)
By arrangement. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in biology.

BUS 245 BUSINESS LAW (3)
A study of the general principles of law which are especially useful in business: contracts, property, credit transactions, negotiable instruments and business organizations. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

BUS 284 GENERAL STATISTICS (3)
A study of applied statistics for sociology and other social, behavioral or natural sciences. This course covers descriptive statistics and statistical inference for parametric and non-parametric situations (z- and t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation, linear regression and chi-square), including related computer applications. Prerequisites: MAT 050 or placement into MAT 100 or above. Cross-listed as PSY 284/SOC 284.

BUS 385 INTERNSHIP (Hours arranged by director, maximum 12 hours)
An internship program allows the student to apply classroom learning to a work experience. Seminars and writing are also a part of the course requirement. By permission of the program director. Credit/no credit.

BUS 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3)
By arrangement.

CEM 121 GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 (5)
The year-long sequence CEM 121 and CEM 122 comprise the standard "freshman chemistry" course for science majors and students pursuing medicine or other health-related fields. Topics in CEM 121 include: chemical formulas and equations, stoichiometry, energy relationships, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding and properties of solids, liquids, gases and solutions. Four lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: placement into College Algebra MAT 100 or higher. Most students will have completed high school chemistry

CEM 122 GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2 (5)
The continuation of CEM 121. Topics: equilibria, acids and bases, precipitation, complex ions, qualitative analysis, rates of reactions, thermodynamics, electro-chemistry, nuclear chemistry, transition metals, nonmetals. Four lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CEM 121.

CEM 221 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 (4)
An overview of organic chemistry, with emphasis on nomenclature, structure-reactivity relationships and applications. The laboratory portion of the course emphasizes basic techniques of separation and analysis used in organic chemistry. Proper procedure and waste disposal will be included in the laboratory portion of the course so that the student may become familiar with standard laboratory safety practice. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CEM 122.

CEM 222 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2 (4)
This course is more in-depth than CEM 221, concentrating on two important skills in organic chemistry: organic structure determination and basic organic synthesis. The first several weeks introduce the use of spectroscopic methods to identify organic compounds. The remainder of the course focuses on understanding organic reactions and using them to construct new molecules. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CEM 221.

CEM 230 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (4)
Quantitative chemical analysis including acid/base, redox, precipitation and complexation equilibria in real solutions. Gravimetric, volumetric, spectroscopic and electrochemical methods are employed in the related laboratory work. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CEM 122.

CEM 235 CELL CHEMISTRY (4)
Cross-listed as BIO 235.

CEM 299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (credit varies)
By arrangement.

CEM 311 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (2)
This course presents advanced topics in chemical bonding and reactivity, emphasizing molecular orbital theory and how it explains the relationship of molecular structure to reaction mechanism. Students will be introduced to computational chemistry as a way of solving chemical problems. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite: CEM 222. Offered alternate years.

CEM 326 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 1 (5)
The full-year sequence of CEM 326 and CEM 327 is a combination of physical chemistry and modern physics. Topics include thermodynamics, relativity, blackbody radiation, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, wave nature of particles, atomic and nuclear spectroscopy, nuclear physics/chemistry and introductory quantum mechanics. Five lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CEM 122, PHY 211, MAT 136 required; MAT 225 and MAT 350 recommended. Offered alternate years. Cross-listed as PHY 326.

CEM 327 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 2 (5)
The continuation of CEM 326. Five lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CEM 326. Offered alternate years. Cross-listed as PHY 327.

CEM 330 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (4)
An advanced study of the chemistry of inorganic compounds with emphasis on those in the first transition metals. Lectures stress bonding theory and symmetry. Laboratory work includes synthesis and spectroscopy of transition and main group compounds. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Offered alternate years.

CEM 341 BIOCHEMISTRY (3)
A study of the physical and chemical properties of biological compounds and their function in living systems. Topics include: protein structure, enzymology, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, lipid chemistry and molecular physiology. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: junior or senior status, CEM 221, and one of BIO 230, BIO 235 or CEM 222.

CEM 360 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4)
A study of scientific instrumentation including input transducers, linear electronics and output transducers. Students design and build simple instruments and study the design and operation of commercial instruments. Three lectures, four-hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite: CEM 122 and PHY 212. Offered alternate years. Cross-listed as PHY 360.

CEM 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CHEMISTRY (1-3)
By arrangement. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in chemistry.

CEM 410 SEMINAR (2)
Chemical topics of current interest are discussed. Formal presentations by the students are required. Students not only examine the topics critically but also learn to present them in a professional manner. This course is offered on demand to seniors only.

COM 105 INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM (3)
Cultivates basic skills and knowledge necessary for a career in print or broadcast journalism. The course covers the history of journalism in the United States, the changing shape of news organizations, basic developments in media law and the essential forms of writing and reporting. Students will learn such basic skills as interviewing, covering meetings and public events, writing news leads and using the inverted pyramid form.

COM 110 THEATRE ACTIVITY (.5)
Participation in technical and/or performance roles in Bluffton University productions.

COM 111 STUDENT NEWSPAPER (BLUFFTONCONNECTION.COM/THE WITMARSUM) ACTIVITY (.5)
Participation on the student newspaper staff in both technical and reporting capacities.

COM 112 RADIO ACTIVITY (.5)
Participation in the production, directing and performance of a radio show on WBWH.

COM 115 FORENSICS ACTIVITY (.5)
Preparation for and participation in the C. Henry Smith Peace Oratory Contest and other forensics events as might be scheduled.

COM 175 SPORT COMMUNICATION (3)
Examines the relationships between sports and media within our cultural context. Through theoretical perspectives involving social criticism, social presence theory, standpoint theory, uses and gratifications theory and rhetorical analysis, participants consider media roles in sport narratives and associated cultural values. Cross-listed as HFS 175.

COM 185 PUBLIC SPEAKING AND PERSUASION (3)
Strengthens students' ethical and social effectiveness in public speaking settings through theoretical and practical knowledge of oral communication and public reasoning practices. The course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become better public speakers, attentive audience members and engaged citizens by increasing their awareness of the ethical, technical and performative dimensions of oral communication, by strengthening their understanding of the logical and persuasive validity of public arguments and by exercising this knowledge during informative, deliberative, transformative and ceremonial public speaking occasions.

COM 195 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (3)
Explores the principles and practices of effective communication in interpersonal relationships. The course will examine such topics as communication apprehension, self-disclosure, listening, conflict and nonverbal communication as well as provide opportunities to develop specific interpersonal communication skills. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

COM 212 ARGUMENTATION AND ADVOCACY (3)
Provides theoretical and practical training in argumentation with particular attention to political and organizational contexts that demand advocacy, including deliberative and forensic occasions. The role of practical argument in addressing social conflict peacefully and fairly will be considered throughout the course. Prerequisite: COM 185.

COM 225 WRITING FOR THE MEDIA (3)
Focuses on news gathering and writing for print, broadcast and new media. In addition to learning journalistic research and writing techniques, students become acquainted with practical aspects of publishing including an introduction to desktop publishing. Philosophical and ethical issues are addressed in the course. Lab experiences include field trips, guest lectures and writing for BlufftonConnection.com. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 120.

COM 240 MEDIA AND CULTURE (3)
The course offers an investigation of the history, technologies and cultural implications of all forms of commercial media in American society. This course is designed to develop in students an appreciation for the cultural significance of the media, an understanding of key theoretical issues in media studies and awareness of key approaches of reading media texts.

COM 275 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION (3)
Assists students in developing those communication skills needed to succeed in the contemporary organizational environment. In addition to examining the dynamics and ethics of professional communication in business and nonprofit organizations, students will learn how to work on cross-functional teams, lead public meetings, conduct personal interviews and prepare a variety of public presentations such as letters, reports and speeches. Throughout the course, attention will be given to such contemporary organizational issues as institutional power, cultural diversity and professional identity.

COM 277 PUBLIC RELATIONS (3)
Introduces strategic issues and effective practices of communication between organizations and their constituencies. Includes the study of public opinion research, media relations, public communications campaigns, consumer identity and representational ethics. Students gain practical experience in writing news releases, conducting surveys and designing integrated campaigns. Prerequisite: COM 185.

COM 312 STUDIES IN CINEMA (3)
Surveys the history, elements, common themes and the art of watching films. The course examines the role cinema plays in our culture and how our culture shapes cinema, explores ethical and spiritual considerations in relation to a variety of film genres and offers different methods of film analysis for study.

COM 334 RADIO PRODUCTION (3)
Provides students with the opportunity to gain the knowledge, skills and techniques needed to produce professional and effective radio programming. Specifically, students learn how to establish a station's identity, organize a broadcasting and production studio, edit program material, produce entertainment and news programming both in-studio and on-location, think through the economics of both commercial and non-commercial radio, and broadcast sporting events. Throughout the course students are not only given the chance to develop skills in each of these areas but also to inquire into the issues related to these specific areas as well as to the whole enterprise of radio broadcasting today.

COM 336 ADVANCED PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING (3)
Provides advanced writing instruction for students intending to become public relations professionals with particular attention to writing for the World Wide Web and other mixed and new media venues. Prerequisite: COM 277.

COM 338 GENDER, RACE & COMMUNICATION (3)
Explores the ways by which gender and race shape understandings of ourselves and others in a variety of communication settings, including mass media, interpersonal relationships, organizational structures and educational practices. This course seeks to develop in students an appreciation for differences in communication across gender and race lines toward the transformation of social relations and the reconciling of antagonisms.

COM 340 RELIGIOUS COMMUNICATION (3)
Introduces students to the theory and practice of religious communication in its sermonic, liturgical, deliberative and promotional forms. The course surveys homiletic theory and explores the role of religious language in congregational worship, decision-making and public relations. Attention is given to such current communication issues as the impact of electronic media on religious messages, the use of gendered language in religious texts and the tension between intimacy and inclusiveness in public worship contexts. Students in the class prepare sermons, write letters of admonition, plan congregational worship services and business meetings, and design church promotional materials. Cross-listed as REL 340.

COM 342 LEADERSHIP IN CHURCH-RELATED ORGANIZATIONS (3)
In large, formal church-related organizations (i.e. World Vision and Habitat for Humanity) and small, informal ones (i.e. local congregations and neighborhood associations), persons of goodwill join together in the name of Christ to voluntarily serve those in need. This course suggests to students: 1) the composition of the church-related not-for-profit sector; 2) the contextual variables within that sector which suggest a need for Christian vision and leadership; and 3) the specific competencies required for involvement and leadership in church-related organizations. The following objectives are pursued: 1) to differentiate by mission and structure the various types of organizations which constitute the not-for-profit sector in general and church-related organizations in particular; 2) to investigate numerous opportunities for involvement in not-for-profit church organizations; and 3) to practice Christian communication and leadership within the not-for-profit sector through selective involvement with voluntary organizations. Throughout the course, such concepts as awareness, empathy, foresight, persuasion and stewardship are introduced and evaluated. Cross-listed as REL 342.

COM 344 RHETORICAL THEORY (3)
Explores theories of rhetoric that have been shaped by biblical, classical, medieval, modern and postmodern contexts. Theories examined in the course include prophetic, Pauline, Sophistical, Platonic, Aristotelian, Augustinian, dramatastic, cultural linguistic, structuralist and post-structuralist perspectives. Throughout the course, particular attention is given to the relationship between discourse and social change.

COM 345 VIDEO PRODUCTION (3)
An introduction to video production through exercises and video productions. Emphasis is placed on understanding video production elements such as story telling, framing, camera angles, scripting, production, post production sound and lighting. Students will become familiar with the role that software and hardware play in the structuring of visual, auditory and motion elements to communicate through video. Prerequisites: COM 105 and COM 334.

COM 346 RHETORICAL CRITICISM (3)
Practical application of a variety of rhetorical research methods to understand, analyze and critique communicative artifacts such as public speeches, press releases, editorials, sermons and other forms of mass mediated messages. Research methods include neo-Aristotelianism, dramatism, mythic criticism, genre criticism, cultural criticism, fantasy theme analysis, psychoanalytic criticism, ideological criticism, postcolonial criticism, feminist criticism and deconstruction.

COM 365 FEATURE WRITING (3)
Provides training in conceiving, researching and writing features for newspapers and magazines. Students will learn how to research features in the age of the internet, gather information through personal interviews and construct articles that shape public understanding of significant contemporary issues, personalities and events. The class will also consider legal and ethical questions that accompany such journalistic leadership. Prerequisite: COM 105.

COM 370 VISUAL CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION (3)
Explores the breadth, characteristics and significance of our increasingly visual culture for human communication. Through the study of visual culture theory and criticism, this course enables students to ask questions about what it means for consciousness, sense of self, relationship to community, encounters with others, etc., to live amidst visual culture. Prerequisite: COM 240.

COM 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
By arrangement.

COM 412 NEW MEDIA (3)
The course centers on coalescing print journalism and broadcast journalism and repurposing content for the Internet. Key principles of broadcast and print journalism are explored. Other areas of inquiry include the challenges and opportunities that the Internet as new media presents for traditional print and broadcast journalism. Prerequisites: COM 105 and COM 334.

COM 417 COMMUNICATION ETHICS (3)
Explores the ethical issues and dilemmas facing communication professionals and scholars through Anabaptist, other Christian and non-Christian traditions of social ethics. Prerequisite: senior standing.

COM 422 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides an opportunity for sustained study of a particular theoretical, critical or professional topic within communication.

COM 425 INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION (1-4)
Provides an opportunity to apply communication skills either in a for-profit organization or a not-for-profit agency. In consultation with an advisor from the communication and theatre department, the student is assigned an organizational supervisor/evaluator at an appropriate business or agency to work at a level commensurate with the student's knowledge and experience. The student works with the organizational representatives to develop a plan that accommodates the needs of the organization and recognizes the level of the student. Communicative skills that may be utilized in this experience include: public speaking, interviewing, writing, editing, human resource management, journalism, broadcasting and leadership in meetings or developing audio/video tools for the organization.

CPS 108 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (3)
This course is an introduction to computer programming which emphasizes the application of fundamental principles to problem solving and programming techniques. Structured programming concepts using a C-type programming language are stressed. Some familiarity with computers is assumed.

CPS 112 OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING WITH APPLIED DATA STRUCTURES (3)
This course is a study of the design of data structures and the analysis of the algorithms used to manipulate them. The fundamental concepts studied in this course serve as a foundation for the advanced computer science concepts studied in later courses. Topics include data types, records, recursion, queues, stacks, linked lists, trees, graphs, searching, sorting, algorithm complexity and classes of algorithms. Software engineering principles are introduced. Prerequisite: CPS 108.

CPS 220 INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (3)
This course is an introduction to the object-oriented programming paradigm. Emphasis is placed on methods, objects, graphics, graphical user interfaces and components, applets and applications, and program development tools. Prerequisite: CPS 112.

CPS 221 APPLICATIONS IN OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (2)
This course focuses on the application of the object-oriented programming paradigm using Java. Areas covered include multithreaded applications, internationalization and security issues, graphics and animation, and simulation. Students work on a term project in their area of interest. Prerequisite: CPS 220.

CPS 320 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3)
This course focuses on the applications of the computer in science and mathematics. Topics include calculation of functions, roots of equations, integration, Fourier analysis, differential equations, Monte-Carlo methods, and curve fitting. Lectures present the concepts of the numerical analysis topics covered and their corresponding algorithms; students are expected to be familiar with the underlying mathematical concepts and the programming methodology necessary for algorithm implementation. Prerequisites: CPS 108 and MAT 136. Offered alternate years.

CPS 322 DATABASE SYSTEMS (3)
This course has its primary focus on the relational model for database organization. Topics include the relational data structure, relational algebra, normalization, integrity, recovery, concurrency and distributed databases. Assignments include team projects involved in the various stages of information systems development: definition, design, implementation, testing, and documentation. Prerequisite: CPS 112. Offered alternate years.

CPS 331 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES AND COMPILERS (3)
This course studies the design and implementation of modern programming languages, compilers, and interpreters. Concepts of data representation, storage allocation, scope, code generation, lexical analysis, and parsing of context-free grammars are examined. Students design and implement a simple compiler. Prerequisite: CPS 221. Offered alternate years.

CPS 333 SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING (3)
This course focuses on the writing of programs that utilize web, network, and operating system services in order to perform a task. Topics include Internet protocols, CGI, RPC, XML, DOM, SOAP, and AJAX. Operating shell programming is also introduced. Prerequisite: CPS 221. Offered alternate years.

CPS 341 OPERATING SYSTEMS (3)
Students are provided with an examination of the characteristics of modern operating systems and its related software. Topics include process and memory management, scheduling issues, performance metrics, and concurrent programming. Case studies of various operating systems are conducted. Prerequisite: CPS 220 or junior standing. Offered alternate years.

CPS 343 NETWORK AND SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION (3)
This course deals with issues involving both network configuration and systems administration. The OSI layered reference model serves as an outline to the course. Topics include the physical architecture of computer networks, networking protocols and services, resource management, directory services, system and network security/privacy, and network and system monitoring. A special emphasis is placed on understanding TCP/IP and various related services (DNS, DHCP, SMTP, HTTP, LDAP). In addition, Windows NT Server is frequently used as a case study. Prerequisite: CPS 341. Offered alternate years.

CPS 350 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE (3)
Students are provided with an introduction to computer hardware organization, the instruction execution cycle, and the relationship between machine/assembly languages and high-level programming languages. The Intel 8086 family of microprocessors is used to provide opportunities for machine and assembly language programming. Architectural and organizational issues are also addressed. Prerequisite: CPS 220 or junior standing. Offered alternate years.

CPS 352 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS AND COMPUTERS (4)
This course presents a study of digital electronics and an overview of its use in computers. Topics include logic, logic integrated circuits, processors, memory, processor-peripheral communication, and instrument interfacing. Prerequisites: CPS 350 and PHY 212. Offered alternate years. Cross-listed as PHY 352.

CPS 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (credit varies)
By arrangement.

CPS 399 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (credit varies)
By arrangement.

CRJ 180 LAW, JUSTICE AND SOCIETY (3)
An examination of the different policy options for the criminal justice system, with particular attention to the connection between law and justice. The limits of law as a means of resolving disputes and maintaining social order are also examined. The course addresses the complex elements of "justice" and the difficulties of administering justice in a democratic society by examining the social construction of law throughout history. The course looks at one particular alternative to the present criminal justice system and administration of law called restorative justice. The third section of the course critically addresses a number of specified legal policies in the United States.

CRJ 200 INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)
A study of the agencies, institutions and processes of the criminal justice system - legislature, police, attorney, courts and corrections; the definitions of crime, legal defenses and limits of the law; constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure; kinds and degrees of evidence; cases and materials affecting criminal law, prosecution, defense and the courts.

CRJ 201 INTRODUCTION TO THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)
A study of the agencies, institutions and processes of the juvenile justice system; historical and social-scientific evaluation of judicial decisions affecting the development and operation of the juvenile justice system from the police investigation to adjudication and final disposition.

CRJ 275 CRIMINOLOGY (3)
A social-scientific, theoretical survey of the nature of crime, including causal factors and theories and procedures in prevention and treatment; evaluation of basic assumptions and philosophies of corrections. Prerequisite: SOC 152. Cross-listed as SOC 275.

CRJ 303 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3)
A specialized course of study focusing upon a significant theme or topic in political science. Topics may include Canadian or European politics, the American presidency, voting behavior, state and local government or international conflict resolution. May be taken more than once with different topics. Cross-listed as PLS 301.

CRJ 310 CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE (3)
This course focuses on the study of substantive criminal law and criminal procedure in the courts of Ohio and the U.S. Federal system. A case study method is used to analyze criminal law in the United States, the manner in which cases are processed through the criminal system and the influences affecting their outcome. Prerequisites: CRJ 180 and CRJ 200.

CRJ 320 FAMILY VIOLENCE (3)
Violent family life has largely been hidden from public analysis. In this class we critically examine the emergence of intimate violence as a social problem, are exposed to experiences of persons involved with family violence, explore various explanations for violence in families and analyze various prevention and policy measures. In each of these cases, attention is paid to the impact (or non-impact) of demographic factors, such as ethnicity, race and religion, on the occurrence and effect of intimate violence. This course may be taken as part of the Women's Studies minor.

CRJ 325 INTERVENTIONS IN CORRECTIONS (3)
Survey of the theoretical basis for assessing the social and/or therapeutic approaches to the control and rehabilitation of criminal behavior in a correctional context.

CRJ 340 CONFLICT TRANSFORMATION AND MEDIATION (3)
This course has three primary goals: 1) to provide students with an overview of the conflict transformation movement; 2) to provide basic introductory training for students in the practice of interpersonal conflict resolution and mediation in a variety of settings; 3) to encourage students to consider the deeper issues that underlie conflict, violence and war in our society, including issues of culture, power and politics. The issues involved in this class concern matters ranging from interpersonal relationships to youth violence and international peace and reconciliation. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

CRJ 345 RESTORATIVE JUSTICE THEORY AND PRACTICE (3)
An exploration of the philosophy and practice of restorative justice, a new paradigm for how we view and treat criminal events. The course is designed to encourage an in-depth understanding of the needs of victims, offenders and communities in the processing and comprehension of criminal events. The course takes a critical look at the current system of criminal justice and critically examines the alternatives that restorative justice offers. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

CRJ 350 ENFORCEMENT: THEORY AND PRACTICE (3)
Survey of the police role in American life. Focus shared between the police as a formal organization in patrol and investigative operations and the police as a social, psychological or subcultural type. Primary attention given to the relationship of communal security and consent to governmental authority and to the role of the police in the maintenance of order.

CRJ 351 CORRECTIONS (3)
Survey of the correctional system from both a historical and analytical perspective. The course focuses on a variety of topics including sentencing strategies and punishment rationale in democratic societies, the philosophy and effectiveness of rehabilitation, individual adjustment and inmate organization in both male and female prisons, constitutional issues, access and remedies in addressing prisoner s rights, and emerging restorative alternatives to corrections.

CRJ 360 THE JUSTICE PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR I (3)
Students are introduced to the field of criminal justice using a strong field component and focusing on restorative themes. It intentionally considers justice in a broad context including distributive and criminal understandings. The course is intended to help students develop a better understanding of themselves and the field by offering an early field experience (20-25 hours out of class) focused on observation and reflection. The class is for students of criminal justice (major or minor) but is open to any student exploring a possible career in law or criminal justice who has taken the prerequisite courses.

CRJ 380 INTEGRATIVE STUDIES IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)
An interdisciplinary study of management, institutional, philosophical or research concerns in selected system-wide problems and topics in criminal justice.

CRJ 385 CRIMINAL JUSTICE PRACTICUM (3-6)
A supervised work/study placement in a setting consistent with the student's interests and career goals. Prerequisites: junior or senior status in the major (or related major) and permission of the faculty supervisor. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours; with 3 hours credited to general electives and/or a related major (with permission of major professor).

CRJ 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
By arrangement.

CRJ 411 SOCIAL SCIENCES CAPSTONE (3)
This capstone course is cross-listed in Criminal Justice, Public Health and Political Science. Capstone experiences provide students with an opportunity to reflect upon their education experiences and apply the knowledge and skills gained during their course of study. In this class, students will utilize problem-based learning to review key ideas and examine how they embed in the broader context of the social sciences. In parallel with the course content, students will engage in career development activities, including resume building, job searching and interviewing skills, as they prepare to join the workforce or pursue a graduate education. Students without prior field experience will need to complete the relevant placement/internship (at least 2 semester hours/80 on site hours in their relevant field) in conjunction with the course. Topics covered in the course: career development, applied problem-solving, identifying interdisciplinary connections in the social sciences. Cross-listed as PHL 411/PLS 411.

ECN 141 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3)
An introduction to the American economy, the nature and method of economics and the economizing problem. Topics include national income, employment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, economic stability and economic growth.

ECN 142 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)
A continuation of ECN 141. Emphasis is on decision-making by households and resource allocation by business firms. Topics include the different types of market structures, the resource markets, consumer behavior and international trade.
Prerequisite: ECN 141.

ECN 232 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (3)
This course applies the principles of economics to an economic analysis of producer and consumer behavior. The emphasis is on indifference curve, isoquant analysis, the theory of price, cost and market structure and their application to current issues. Prerequisites: ECN 141 and ECN 142. Offered alternate years.

ECN 233 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (3)
This course applies the principles of economics to an economic analysis of unemployment, inflation and economic growth. Emphasis is on determining policies for achieving macroeconomic goals and controversies among various schools of thought. Prerequisites: ECN 141, ECN 142 and satisfactory completion of the department's minimum mathematics requirement. Offered alternate years.

ECN 347 LABOR ECONOMICS (3)
Emphasis on economics of labor and labor organizations in the contemporary economy: composition of the labor force, union organization, collective bargaining, wage determination, labor law and economic insecurity. Prerequisites: ECN 141 and ECN 142. Offered alternate years.

ECN 351 PUBLIC FINANCE (3)
Federal, state and local government expenditures, revenues, debt and fiscal administration with emphasis on fiscal problems and policies of the federal government. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120, and ECN 141 and ECN 142. Offered alternate years.

ECN 371 INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND INVESTMENT (3)
A study of the theories, policies and institutions of international trade and finance, balance of payment equilibrium and international firms. Prerequisites: ECN 141 and ECN 142. Offered alternate years.

ECN 382 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3)
A survey of the experience in both developed and less-developed countries to isolate the socio-economic factors that stimulate or hinder economic development, the implications for natural environment and possible limits to growth due to food or natural resource scarcities, and the application of economic theory to the development process. Prerequisites: ECN 141 and ECN 142. Offered alternate years. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

ECN 385 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS (3)
An introduction to measurement in economics and business with correlation and regression models, both bivariate and multivariate. Emphasis is on the results of violation of the model assumptions and interpretation of standard multiple regression programs. Prerequisites: BUS 284, ECN 141, ECN 142, and either MAT 115 or MAT 135. Offered as a directed study.

ECN 400 ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS SEMINAR (2)
A capstone course designed to be taken near the completion of the undergraduate educational experience in which students conduct a research project to integrate and apply the concepts that they learned during their college experience in analyses of current economic and business issues. Offered as a directed study. 

EDU 005 ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION
When a candidate for a teaching license has completed all the requirements for Checkpoint 1 - Admission to Teacher Education, this will be posted to the transcript and on the graduation audit. Completing these requirements is a prerequisite for EDU 353 Education Psychology and Instructional Practices and all subsequent education classes. It is expected that all requirements will be completed concurrent with EDU 200 Introduction to Teaching in a Diverse Society. To review the requirements for Checkpoint 1 - Admission to Teacher Education, please go to the education department website.

EDU 200 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY (3)
This course is designed to provide a beginning opportunity for students to assess their compatibility with the teaching profession. It serves as an introduction to the history and philosophy of education, school finances, curriculum and the sociology of education. It also provides a study of the characteristics, abilities and educational needs of children and adolescents, both typically developing and those who are diverse in their educational needs. It will provide a study of the structures of American education and special education, educational reform, multicultural considerations in American education and the impact of socio-economic conditions on education. Corequisite: EDU 205.

EDU 205 FIELD EXPERIENCE (1)
Students complete a 40-hour field-based experience during which they assist classroom teachers. Placements with rich cultural, economic and learning diversity are selected. Through these experiences students reflect on the teaching profession, students, families and schools in general and begin to develop a personal philosophy of education. Corequisite: EDU 200, EDU 220. Credit/no credit.

EDU 220 CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT (2)
General and specific topics related to curriculum development and general teaching methods, lesson and unit development, constructivist teaching, and effective classroom practices including formal and informal assessment for adolescent and multiage classrooms. 30 field hours.

EDU 255 DEVELOPMENTAL CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD I: SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS (3)
This course is designed to develop knowledge of how young children (ages 3-8) develop and learn and to provide opportunities that support all areas of development of young children with special emphasis on cognitive development in the science and math classrooms. Students will create, evaluate and select topics of study in terms of conceptual soundness, significance and intellectual integrity using developmentally appropriate materials, equipment and environments. Informal and formal assessment strategies to plan and individualize curriculum and teaching practices will be incorporated. Topics to be covered in this course: theoretical framework (assumptions and beliefs); how children learn (both typically and atypically developing); early mathematic experiences; discovery in the physical world; and nutrition. All topics will be addressed within a framework of cultural sensitivity. Curriculum areas addressed in this course use the Ohio Department of Education's competency-based models as a framework. 10 field hours in an integrated, inclusive early childhood setting is required. Prerequisite: EDU 200, EDU 205 and sophomore standing.

EDU 256 DEVELOPMENTAL CURRICULUM: SOCIAL STUDIES AND LANGUAGE ARTS (3)
This course develops knowledge and skills necessary to provide instruction based on national social studies and language arts standards and state curriculum models for students in PreK-3, with an emphasis on the use of a variety of instructional approaches for culturally and developmentally diverse classrooms. The course will prepare students to utilize approaches to teaching and learning which integrate content relevant to students' lives, honor individual differences, and teach basic skills of inquiry and communication, including the application of educational technology. Students will create, evaluate and select topics of study in terms of conceptual soundness, significance and intellectual integrity using developmentally appropriate materials, equipment and environments. Informal and formal assessment strategies to plan and individualize curriculum and teaching practices will be incorporated. Prerequisite: EDU 200, EDU 205, PSY 110.

EDU 282 TEACHING READING THROUGH LITERATURE: EARLY CHILDHOOD (3)
During this course, students will read books for children pre-school through the primary grades, analyze and criticize their content, illustrations, and possible use, investigate the literature s portrayal of ethnic and racial groups, recognize outstanding authors and artists, learn how literature and visual art is integrated into the reading/language curriculum and develop reading aloud and storytelling techniques to promote literature appreciation. This course will also provide opportunities that support the aesthetic development in and appreciation for visual art. Students will learn basic fundamentals of art and principles of design as tools to help make meaning from works of art, including picture book illustrations. Emphasis is placed on methods that the general classroom teacher can use to communicate with and teach children with diverse learning styles in reading. Students will become sensitive to the concerns of speech and language differences related to culture and environmental issues. Prerequisite: EDU 200, EDU 205 and sophomore standing

EDU 285 PHONICS AND WORD IDENTIFICATION (3)
This course will teach methods for using phonics and word identification skills with early childhood and young adolescent learners. Students will understand techniques and strategies used to teach children to match, blend and translate letters of the alphabet into the sounds they represent in a systematically integrated, developmentally appropriate instructional program incorporating reading, writing and spelling. Topics to be covered in this course: theory and research, foundations, decoding, encoding, strategies for applications, assessment and evaluation. 40 field hours. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 205 and sophomore standing.

EDU 287 DEVELOPMENTAL CURRICULUM: LITERATURE AND THE ARTS (3)
This course is designed to provide opportunities that support the aesthetic development in art, music and movement in children ages 3-8 who are both typically and atypically developing. Students will learn to plan and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum and instructional practices based on knowledge of individual children, the community, curriculum goals and content using a variety of strategies to encourage children's aesthetic development. Topics to be covered in this course: fostering creativity, music and movement (framework and programs), exploration with materials and planning and assessing programs. Curriculum areas addressed in this course use the Ohio Department of Education's competency based models as a framework. 10 field hours in early childhood settings are required. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 205 and sophomore standing.

EDU 297 TEACHING READING THROUGH LITERATURE IN MIDDLE CHILDHOOD (3)
This course focuses on comprehension strategies across the curriculum to help middle graders learn most effectively by becoming strategic readers. Evaluation and assessment methods, especially those which encourage, are utilized. Students develop teaching and learning strategies to help students comprehend, interpret, evaluate and appreciate texts for students in grades 4-9. The Ohio Department of Education Academic Content Standards are used in this class. Prerequisites: EDU 200 and EDU 205.

EDU 302 READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS: MIDDLE CHILDHOOD (3)
This course is a study of research-based middle school classroom practices in content area reading and includes an emphasis in: 1) strategies, techniques and materials for strengthening vocabulary, comprehension, thinking and study skills, writing across the curriculum and content learning; and 2) using an integrated approach to provide for individual differences in the context of diagnostic-prescriptive teaching. Clinical experience involves students in textbook evaluation, development of materials and lesson planning. Topics to be covered in this course: vocabulary building, comprehension techniques, thinking and study skills, writing across the curriculum, content learning textbook evaluation and lesson planning. The Ohio Department of Education Academic Content Standards are used as framework for this course. 20 field/clinical hours. Offered in the fall only. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 205, EDU 220 and EDU 353.

EDU 303 COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION (2)
This course includes instruction about the use of computers and other technology for the classroom teacher. Students receive hands-on experience with computers, appropriate software for use in education such as presentation software, educational use of the Internet and other classroom technology such as digital cameras and projection equipment. Prerequisites: EDU 200 and EDU 205.

EDU 305 CONTENT AREA LITERACY/GENERAL METHODS (3)
This is a course to prepare the prospective A/YA or MA school teacher in the study of research-based strategies, methods and materials designed to develop and strengthen content literacy skills. Emphasis is placed on levels of thinking skills, development of technical content vocabulary and techniques for improved comprehension. Materials, methods and provision for individual differences are considered in the context of diagnostic-prescriptive teaching. The student is involved in clinical experience through the development of materials, implementation of plans and the evaluation of textbooks. Topics to be covered in this course: thinking skills, technical content vocabulary, comprehension techniques, diagnostic-prescriptive teaching, lesson planning, textbook evaluation, etc. The general methods sections will emphasize 1) general teaching techniques, strategies and methods for maximizing learning for typical and at-risk students; 2) curriculum development and implementation; 3) communication skills required in the adolescent/young adult classroom including reading, writing and speaking; 4) the interdisciplinary nature of disciplines; 5) a minimum of 20 hours of planned/supervised public school field experience in the student's teaching field. Offered in the spring only. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 205, EDU 220 and EDU 353.

EDU 317 STUDIES IN LITERATURE FOR ADOLESCENTS (3)
Students will investigate in depth one topic in literature each time this course is offered. The topics will parallel Ohio Department of Education Academic Content Standards which include (but is not limited to) literature of the Holocaust, settling the West, literature from different cultures and specific genres such as fantasy, science fiction, poetry and biography. Students will be expected to apply their skills of analysis and criticism to the readings as well as apply their knowledge of the literature to the development of classroom-relevant teaching units. The course is intended for students with a concentration in language arts/middle grades and for students seeking integrated language arts licensure for adolescents/young adults. Prerequisite: EDU 200, EDU 205 and junior or senior standing. Offered every other year.

EDU 332 SOCIAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION (3)
A critical examination will be made of selected historical, philosophical and social problems and promises relevant to contemporary education. The intent is to provide students with readings and discussions which will encourage and enable them to establish a set of personal beliefs and commitments. The course is built around the idea that being reflective and critical is of strategic value as we seek to become enlightened about the problems and promises of modern education. Fifteen hours of field experience are required. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120, EDU 200, and EDU 205 and junior or senior standing.

EDU 335 TEACHING AND ASSESSING READING (3)
This course will explore theories and instructional strategies for teaching reading. The focus will be on the principles supporting literacy development, how to help children identify new words most effectively in context, the acquisition of a reading vocabulary, the comprehension of text and the components of effective reading and writing instruction using formal and informal educational assessment. This course is also designed to familiarize prospective classroom teachers with concepts and techniques of reading assessment with emphasis on: 1) developing and administering formal and informal reading assessment tools; 2) assessing student performance in different reading situations; 3) making instructional decisions based on reading assessment results; 4) selecting appropriate reading assessment methods; 5) using self-evaluation as a way of involving students in assessing their own learning. Prerequisites: 30 Field Hours, EDU 200, PSY 110, EDU 285, EDU 220 and EDU 353.

EDU 341 MIDDLE CHILDHOOD INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS AND CLASSROOM ORGANIZATION (3)
Students will investigate curriculum theory, with particular attention paid to an integrated approach to curriculum development for the middle grades. State and national curriculum models will be used to investigate content, sequence and planning for learning. Students will investigate and make application of a variety of methods and materials appropriate to the middle grades and which acknowledge the diversity of learning styles, cultural backgrounds and interests in the middle grades classroom. Students will develop teaching materials, demonstrate lessons, experiment with technology and apply assessment strategies appropriate for middle grade students. This also is designed to assist prospective teachers learn a variety of strategies to develop and maintain learning environments that encourage active, engaged learning, positive interaction and self-motivation for all students. This section of the course is based on an understanding of developmentally appropriate plans based on the unique needs of students in middle childhood. Students will explore techniques maximizing learning in inclusive classrooms as well as traditional settings with a focus on building students self-concept and understanding the use and abuse of teacher power. 12 field hours. Offered in the spring only. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 205, EDU 220, EDU 302 and EDU 353.

EDU 343 EARLY CHILDHOOD INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS AND CLASSROOM ORGANIZATION (3)
This course is designed to provide opportunities that support development in all areas of learning in children ages 3-8. Students will learn to encourage children's learning through an integrated thematic approach that includes play, small group projects, open-ended questioning, group discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning, inquiry experiences and adaptations for children with disabilities. Emphasis will be on helping young children develop intellectual curiosity, solve problems and make decisions. Knowledge of these uses of informal and formal assessment strategies in the teaching of curriculum content areas including mathematics, science, nutrition, social studies, art, music, literacy, health, safety, movement and drama teaching practices will be explored. Topics to be covered in this course: creating an environment for learning, teaching models in early childhood, guiding behavior, planning and assessing programs, and curriculum methods for grades K-3. This course is designed to assist prospective teachers in understanding teacher and student behaviors, discipline in the educational process and communication techniques as they apply to good classroom management. In addition, students will explore techniques for maximizing learning in a variety of early childhood classroom settings, building students self-concepts and understanding the use and abuse of power. 12 field hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and all major requirements as listed in the professional preparation outline for early childhood education. Course must be taken the semester prior to clinical practice. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 205, EDU 220 and EDU 353.

EDU 345 MULTI-AGE CLASSROOM ORGANIZATION (2)
This course is designed to assist prospective teachers in understanding teacher and student behaviors, discipline in the educational process and communication techniques as they apply to good classroom management. In addition, students will explore techniques for maximizing learning in both the general education and inclusive classroom, building students self concepts and understanding the use and abuse of power. 45 field hours. Prerequisite: junior standing, admission to clinical practice and all major requirements as listed in the professional preparation outline for MA. Course is taken during the semester of clinical practice.

EDU 353 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY & INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES (3)
Teaching behavior, instructional techniques and classroom management from a constructivist perspective essential for effective instruction in classrooms. A survey of psychological theories and principles as they apply to teaching. Topics include behavioral and cognitive learning theory, motivation, individual differences, and cognitive, moral and social development. 30 Field Hours. Prerequisite: EDU 005.

EDU 356 EARLY CHILDHOOD PRACTICUM: PRESCHOOL (3)
Students in this course will develop and implement an integrated curriculum that focuses on children's needs and interests, taking into account culturally valued content and children's home experiences. Topics of study will be selected in terms of conceptual soundness, significance and intellectual integrity. A part of this course is field work in preschool. Students will use individual and group guidance and problem-solving techniques to develop positive and supportive relationships with children, to encourage positive social interaction among children, to promote positive strategies of conflict resolution and to help children develop personal self-control, self-motivation and self-esteem. Establishing effective communication and collaborative, positive relationships with families will be encouraged. Administering a preschool will be a component of the course. Topics to be covered in this course: theories for interaction, physical environments supporting interactions, planning and assessing programs, licensing, certification, accreditation, professional considerations, working with parents, financing the program and nutrition. 40 field hours. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 205 and EDU 285.

EDU 358 EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRAMMING (3)
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills related to early childhood development, program development, working with families and working with other professionals. 10 field hours.

EDU 384 CHILD DEVELOPMENT PRACTICUM (1)
A 40-hour practicum in an early childhood setting in which students will collaborate with children, teachers and other professionals. Sites can include preschools, child development centers and other agencies that deal specifically with the early childhood environment. Students will gain practical experience with working with young children and learning fundamental aspects of operations/management of such facilities.

EDU 385 TESOL PRACTICUM (2)
A 30 hour practicum in a school based setting (K-12) with a cooperating teacher who is TESOL credentialed by the Ohio Department of Education. Bluffton University supervision is provided by a supervisor with TESOL credentials and experience in a TESOL classroom. Prerequisites: ENG 210, ENG 220, ENG 271, ENG 312. Credit/No credit.

EDU 401 A/YA SPECIAL METHODS: LANGUAGE ARTS (2)
EDU 402 A/YA SPECIAL METHODS: SCIENCE (2)
EDU 403 A/YA SPECIAL METHODS: SOCIAL STUDIES (2)
EDU 404 A/YA SPECIAL METHODS: MATH (2)
These courses provide the prospective A/YA educator with methods and materials for language arts, life sciences or physical sciences, integrated social studies, or integrated math. These courses are taught at Ohio Northern University as part of the Teacher Education Consortium. Topics covered in these courses: development, implementation and evaluation of educational programming for A/YA language arts, life sciences or physical sciences, integrated social studies, or integrated math. Additional topics include federal and state curriculum models and assessment models, classroom assessment strategies (formal and informal), use of technology, individualizing instruction, development of integrated units, collaboration and consultation. The focus will be on maximizing student learning. Prerequisite: junior standing. Course is taken prior to the semester of clinical practice.

EDU 405 MIDDLE CHILDHOOD: LANGUAGE ARTS (2)
EDU 406 MIDDLE CHILDHOOD: SCIENCE (2)
EDU 407 MIDDLE CHILDHOOD: SOCIAL STUDIES (2)
EDU 408 MIDDLE CHILDHOOD: MATH (2)
These courses provide the prospective middle childhood educator with methods and materials for reading and language arts, math, social studies or science classrooms. Each student will take two methods sections based on areas of concentration. Topics covered in these courses: development, implementation and evaluation of educational programming for middle childhood reading and language arts, math, social studies or science classrooms within the Ohio Department of Education Academic Content Standards and federal curriculum guidelines, classroom assessment strategies (formal and informal), uses of technology, individualizing instruction, teaming, development of integrated units, collaboration and consultation. The focus will be on maximizing student learning. Prerequisite: junior standing. 45 field hours for each of the two classes. Course is taken during the semester of clinical practice.

EDU 425 LEADERSHIP SEMINAR (2)
This seminar will provide an overview of the clinical practice experience and provide details of the state requirements for licensure, including the Value-Added Dimension, Teacher Performance Assessment e-portfolio, Resident Educator Licensure, and Code of Conduct for the Profession. Students will also compile a credential file.

EDU 445, EDU 450, EDU 451, EDU 452, OR SED 453 CLINICAL PRACTICE (12)
Clinical practice provides supervised experiences in applying the principles and techniques learned in the professional courses to actual classroom situations under the guidance and direction of a cooperating teacher. Clinical practitioners spend full days in their assigned public classroom for 12 weeks during their senior year. Registration is limited to candidates who are formally accepted into teacher education and who have applied for admission to Clinical Practice. Acceptance into Clinical Practice is based on completing the requirements specified in the Clinical Practice Handbook (available from the education department). Practitioners register for one of the following sections: Early Childhood (EDU 445), Middle Childhood (EDU 450), adolescent/young adult (EDU 451), multi-age (EDU 452) or Intervention Specialist (SED 453).
Prerequisite for adolescent/young adult and multi-age: all professional education courses and licensure area course work. Prerequisite for early childhood, intervention specialist and middle childhood: all major requirements as listed in the licensure program outlines. 12 weeks / full days. credit/ no credit.

ENG 102 ACADEMIC WRITING (3)
Academic Writing is a course designed to introduce the various elements of academic reading and writing and to develop skills and provide strategies for greater success throughout a student s academic career. Time will be spent decoding and interpreting academic English, both in reading and in writing, and students will be encouraged to explore how language is used in various contexts for academic purposes.

ENG 108 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (3)
An English language course for high intermediate to low advanced non-native English speakers. The language skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening are well covered. English for a new cultural setting and English for academic work are emphasized.

ENG 110 COLLEGE ENGLISH (3)
Designed to help students improve writing and critical thinking skills needed in college. Students analyze and critique written texts in the process of writing several analytical essays. Students work through the research process and write a research essay.

ENG 111 SHALITH ACTIVITY (.5)
Activity credit for editing and production of student literary magazine.

ENG 112 INSPIRATION POINT ACTIVITY (.5)
Activity credit for editing on-line literary magazine. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

ENG 120 ADVANCED COLLEGE ENGLISH (3)
Designed to help students improve writing and critical thinking skills needed in college. Students analyze and critique challenging written texts in the process of writing several analytical essays. Students work through the research process and write a research essay. Placement in this class is based on college entrance scores and high school record.

ENG 160 APPROACHES TO LITERATURE (3)
An introduction to the methods and practices of literary study at the college level. Includes reading, discussion and writing about primary texts and introduction to secondary materials and research strategies.

ENG 180 THEMES IN LITERATURE (3)
Exploration of ideas within the context of imaginative literary works. The themes will vary from year to year and according to instructor. Examples: humankind's search for meaning, crime and punishment, nature, the city, love.

ENG 202 CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION (3)
An introduction to the craft of fiction, taught in a workshop format. Students will write and critique their own short fiction and read some fiction and theory. Offered alternate years.

ENG 203 CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY (3)
An introduction to the craft of poetry, taught in a workshop format. Students will write and critique their own poems and read poetry and poetics. Offered alternate years.

ENG 205 CREATIVE WRITING: NONFICTION (3)
An introduction to the craft of writing literary essays and creative nonfiction. Offered alternate years.

ENG 207 PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3)
This course introduces students to writing conventions and discourse strategies for producing both formal and informal documents in a variety of workplace settings. Offered alternate years.

ENG 210 TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES: THEORIES AND ISSUES (3)
An introduction to theories and concepts that inform English teaching when students are not native English speakers. Students will understand the similarities and differences between first and second language acquisition, within the context of the United States. They will become familiar with the terminology and definitions, historical and legal precedents of programs for students learning a second language and educational issues related to language minority students, including how a student's culture may impact learning and performance in and out of the classroom.

ENG 220 TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES: INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS AND ASSESSMENT (3)
Students will develop skills in the development of lessons for teaching new language learners that reflect Ohio's grade-level learning outcomes. They will apply research findings as they select, adapt and create a wide variety of resources that are appropriate for the second language learners with whom they work. TESOL students will also develop knowledge of and skills in the assessment of second language learners. They will use age-appropriate assessment procedures, interpret data to make instructional decisions, communicate assessment results to students and their caregivers, and develop strategies to help their students use assessment information to make decisions about their learning.

ENG 240 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
A chronological survey of American literature from the colonial period through the 20th century. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 120.

ENG 243 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Repeatable. Offered alternate years.

ENG 252 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (3)
An introductory course emphasizing the phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics of the English language with examples from other languages as well.

ENG 256 SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 1 (3)
A chronological survey of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century. Offered alternate years.

ENG 257 SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 2 (5)
A chronological survey of English literature from the 19th century to the present. Offered alternate years.

ENG 261 STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (3)
Repeatable. Offered alternate years.

ENG 265 STUDIES IN MODERN LITERATURE (3)
Repeatable. Offered alternate years.

ENG 271 ENGLISH GRAMMAR (3)
A systematic study of the grammar of standard English based upon insights from several linguistic traditions, including that of transformational grammar.

ENG 282 STUDIES IN THE NOVEL (3)
Repeatable. Offered alternate years.

ENG 302 ADVANCED WRITING: FICTION (3)
Advanced writing in fiction. Taught mainly in workshop format, this course extends and develops students' writing skills and knowledge of the resources of the genre. Offered every third year.

ENG 303 ADVANCED WRITING: POETRY (3)
Advanced writing in poetry. Taught mainly in workshop format, this course extends and develops students' writing skills and knowledge of the resources of the genre. Offered every third year.

ENG 305 ADVANCED WRITING: NONFICTION (3)
Advanced writing in nonfiction. Taught mainly in workshop format, this course extends and develops students' writing skills and knowledge of the resources of the genre. Offered every third year.

ENG 312 LANGUAGE VARIATION (3)
This course introduces students to the dialects of American English and to international forms of English known as world Englishes. The nature and evolution of pidgin and creole forms of English are explored, as are such linguistic phenomena as code switching and diglossia. The meanings of language and dialect are examined and relevant material from selected non-English languages is introduced to illustrate course concepts and to show contrasts between English and other languages. Offered alternate years.

ENG 321 STUDIES IN POETRY (3)
Repeatable. Offered alternate years.

ENG 331 ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM (3)
Study of a special topic or classification of literature. Examples: African-American literature, literary criticism. These seminars are restricted to an enrollment of 15 students. Prerequisite: upper-class standing or permission of instructor. Repeatable. Offered alternate years.

ENG 367 SHAKESPEARE (3)
Study and discussion of Shakespeare's major works. Prerequisite: upper-class standing or permission of instructor. Offered alternate years.

ENG 385 TESOL PRACTICUM (2)
A 30 hour practicum in a school based setting (K-12) with a cooperating teacher who is TESOL credentialed by the Ohio Department of Education. Bluffton University supervision is provided by a supervisor with TESOL credentials and experience in a TESOL classroom. Prerequisites: ENG 210, ENG 220, ENG 271, ENG 312. Credit/No credit.

ENG 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
By arrangement.

ENG 401 CRITICAL THEORY (3)
A survey of modern critical theory and issues with emphasis on primary theoretical and philosophical texts. Various theoretical approaches will be considered, as well as issues relating to the canon, to authorial intention and to the value of theory itself. It is expected that students will apply their understandings of modern theoretical approaches in ENG 402. Prerequisite: junior or senior status.

ENG 402 RESEARCH SEMINAR (2)
Introduces the student to research procedures and methodologies, which will result in an original research thesis on a literary topic. The course will include methods of research, preparation of a prospectus, writing a research document and presenting research orally. The study may focus on literature, language, communication or drama.

ENG 425 INTERNSHIP (1-3)
Editorial work through independent study by which a student may earn credit. Assignments may include work with student publications, the Bluffton University public relations office or local newspapers. By arrangement.

ENG 430 WRITING SEMINAR (2)
Completion of a major writing project with close supervision and feedback. The project may be in a single genre or a combination of genres organized by some theme or topic. Submission of the project (or parts of it) to appropriate magazines/journals with the goal of publication.

FIN 353 MONEY AND BANKING (3)
A study of the economic nature of money, banks and other depository institutions and the Federal Reserve System. Emphasis is given to understanding transactions involving the interaction of commercial banks and Federal Reserve System in impacting the money supply. Prerequisites: ECN 141, ECN 142, ACT 151, ACT 152 and satisfactory completion of the department's minimum mathematics requirement.

FIN 366 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (3)
An introduction to the financial markets and the basic finance functions of the business firm. Topics include risk and return on investment, short-term and long-term financing, financial analysis and planning and capital investment. Prerequisites: ECN 141, ECN 142, ACT 151, ACT 152 and junior status.

FIN 367 FINANCIAL INVESTMENTS (3)
An examination of the basic principles of investment, securities analysis and the construction of an investment portfolio. Application of the basic principles will be used from the viewpoint of the individual investor as well as the institutional investor. Prerequisite: FIN 366. Offered alternate years.

FIN 368 FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS (3)
A study of the management of financial institutions such as commercial banks, savings and loan associations, insurance companies and pension funds. Financial markets, government regulation and capital management problems will be discussed. Prerequisites: FIN 366 and FIN 353. Offered alternate years.

GEO 111 PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY (3)
Study of people, nations and theatres of current events in their physical environment in order that the student may more accurately analyze social and political problems. Recommended for state teaching certification in social studies but does not count for the history major.

GRK 111, GRK 121 NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 1, 2 (3 each)
An introduction to the elements of New Testament Greek with emphasis on the mastery of basic forms, vocabulary and syntax. The class combines the formal, systematic approach with the inductive approach to language learning with reading in the Gospel of John. The two semesters are designed to be taken in immediate sequence. Students are also introduced to the culturally conditioned structures of thought reflected in the Greek language. Students completing the course will be able to read simpler portions of the New Testament at sight and more difficult portions with the aid of a lexicon. Offered by special arrangement as a directed study .

HEB 111, HEB 121 OLD TESTAMENT HEBREW 1, 2 (3 each)
An introduction to the Hebrew language of the Old Testament. The two semesters are designed to be taken in immediate sequence. Students study the basic grammar of the language and read short portions of a wide number of Old Testament books. Students completing the course will be able to read simpler portions of the Old Testament at sight and more difficult portions with the aid of a lexicon. Offered by special arrangement as a directed study .

HFS 110 INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE (3)
Provides an introduction to exercise science and the theory of movement and play. Assists the professional in acquiring the skills necessary to appreciate the values of movement. Includes a study of the qualifications and professional preparation of the exercise science major. Covers aims and background of modern programs. The psychological implications of movement education are included. First-year student or sophomore standing.

HFS 112 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT MANAGEMENT (3)
This is a foundational course designed to introduce the student to the sport management profession. It will provide an overview of the sport industry including but not limited to organizational structures, event and facility management, sport communication, and interscholastic, intercollegiate and professional athletics.

HFS 115 INTRODUCTION TO RECREATION AND SPORT LEADERSHIP (3)
Covers foundations of organized recreation, backgrounds and theories, objectives and principles, social and economic factors, public, private and commercial interests, and recreation and social institutions.

HFS 117 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT MEDICINE (3)
This course will focus on two categories. One category will be a head to toe evaluation emphasizing initial care and prevention of athletic injuries. Risk factors and mechanisms of athletic injuries are identified. Lab experiences are provided in taping, wrapping and usage of various modalities. The second category will be on CPR and First Aid. Students will earn their American Red Cross Certification by the end of the class.

HFS 118 VIDEO ACTIVITY (.5)
Participation in a minimum of 12 events with on-line video streaming for home athletic events.

HFS 119 SPORT INFORMATION ACTIVITY (.5)
Participation in a minimum of 12 athletic events with our Sport Information Director at home athletic events.

HFS 120 TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 1 (3)
HFS 130 TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 2 (3)
These courses emphasize personal mastery of the psychomotor skills and cognitive material of selected sport activities as well as the ability to analyze skill techniques. Instruction concentrates on the point of view of the participant as a prospective player.

HFS 135 GAMES AND SOCIAL RECREATION (3)
Focuses on individual, dual, low-organization activities, quiet games, table games and social mixers usable in programming in a recreation setting.

HFS 145 RECREATION ARTS AND CRAFTS (3)
Involves designing for and working with various craft media including paper, metal, metal enamel, clay and other ceramic materials, plastic and weaving materials for children through adulthood in various recreational settings.

HFS 150 HUMAN SEXUALITY (2)
This course is designed to examine the role and meaning of human sexuality as it relates to oneself and others. This course also considers society's sexual value systems including the Anabaptist/Mennonite perspective and reviews biological, psychological and sociological aspects of sexuality.

HFS 155 ADVENTURES IN OUTDOOR RECREATION (1-2)
Designed to develop introductory skills in a variety of outdoor recreation adventure opportunities in areas such as: whitewater rafting, skiing, kayaking, backpacking and mountaineering.

HFS 160 DRUG EDUCATION (2)
The course focuses on the problem of drugs in our society. Pharmacological, physiological, psychological and sociological aspects of drugs are studied. The course emphasizes that we are all drug educators regardless of the profession we choose. Each student is asked to suggest an active "plan" that can alter drug dependence using cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains of learning as a method of behavior modification.

HFS 175 SPORT COMMUNICATION (3)
Cross-listed as COM 175.

HFS 205 RECREATION LEADERSHIP AND PROGRAM (3)
Studies principles of leadership and their application in the development of recreation programs. Topics such as goal setting, strength identification, value clarification and leadership throughout the lifespan will be explored.

HFS 215 OUTDOOR RECREATION (3)
Study of basic techniques and resource availability for camping, hiking, backpacking, mountaineering and related activities. Review of the interest in outdoor recreation and its impact upon facilities and environment.

HFS 220 PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH CONCERNS (3)
Examines individual health habits and the normal developmental pattern for humans from conception through old age. The course emphasizes discussions and decisions about sexuality, marriage, selection of mate and proper nutrition and fitness. Communicable and chronic disease recognition and prevention and community/national health responsibility are explored.

HFS 225 COMMERCIAL RECREATION (3)
This course deals with the private sector of recreation opportunities, including industrial corporations, establishment of private corporations, profit camps, sports clubs and the use of public land by private endeavors. Offered alternate years.

HFS 230 SPORT PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Sport psychology is the psychological study of individuals in relation to sports and sport environments. Psychological principles are used to provide a foundation for understanding athletes, coaches, teams, fans, opponents and the mental aspects of sports. The focus is on performance enhancement through the use of mental skills training.

HFS 235 FACILITIES PLANNING AND CONSTRUCTION (3)
An in-depth exploration into planning, constructing, equipping and managing a variety of recreation facilities. Funding and fundraising is also explored. Offered alternate years.

HFS 240 COACHING METHODS (3)
This course examines the profession of coaching and involves studying the functions, techniques and methods of coaching boys' and girls' interscholastic/intercollegiate athletic teams. Organization and administration of athletic (and exercise science) programs are studied with sociological implications considered.

HFS 245 CAMPING ADMINISTRATION (3)
This course deals with the development and implementation of successful camping programs and the total camp operation.

HFS 255 COMPETITIVE STRENGTH TRAINING AND EXERCISE (2)
This course will provide both classroom and practical experience in the analysis of personal fitness and nutritional habits. The student will learn to correlate exercise science related coursework and practical skills of strength training and exercise.

HFS 265 PERSONAL TRAINING AND EXERCISE (2)
Students will learn the basic fitness assessment and exercise prescription concepts. Exercise testing and prescription are presented within a health-related context, with practical applications for sports nutrition, weight management, the aging process and prevention and management of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, osteoporosis and arthritis.

HFS 270 SPORT ETHICS (3)
Students will explore the ethical presuppositions of competitive athletics and their connection both to ethical theory and to concrete moral dilemmas that arise in actual athletic competition. Students will examine the ethics of genetically enhancing athletic abilities, the morality of cheating, the ethics of strategic fouling and the impact of performance-enhancing drugs on the legitimacy of records. Students will be challenged to consider the morality of competition in sports, the ethical aspects of violence in sports and the arguments in defense of intercollegiate sports.

HFS 305 PLANNING FOR SPECIAL EVENTS (3)
This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on creating, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing and implementing campus and community events. Offered alternate years.

HFS 310 KINESIOLOGY (3)
The science of human movement encompasses the anatomical and mechanical aspects of movement as they relate to sport, games and dance. Prerequisite: BIO 230, junior or senior standing. Offered alternate years.

HFS 315 THERAPEUTIC RECREATION SERVICE (3)
Involves a study of leadership skills, techniques and adaptation of recreation activities for persons with disabilities. Offered alternate years.

HFS 320 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY (3)
This course focuses on the immediate and long-term effects of exercise on the human body including theories and principles for improving performance. Prerequisite: BIO 230; physics, chemistry preferred. Offered alternate years.

HFS 325 RECREATION AND THE AGING PROCESS (3) (inactive)
The role of recreation as it relates to understanding and working with older persons. Emphasizes the role of the recreation manager in pre-retirement planning and in social programs planning for the older adult in retirement. Offered alternate years.

HFS 335 TRENDS, ISSUES AND LEGISLATION IN RECREATION (3) (inactive)
A course designed to explore current issues, trends and legislation affecting the recreation management professional. Offered alternate years.

HFS 350 SPORT AND ADMINISTRATION MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (3)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the many opportunities that exist for the professional administrator in sport management. A discussion of the foundation of sport management, career and employment opportunities, and essential skills needed in management aids the student in the development of his/her own personal philosophy of sport management in the 21st century. Offered alternate years.

HFS 355 STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING (3)
This course is designed for students preparing for the National Strength and Conditioning Association's (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification or for students wishing to gain additional practical application of exercise science, strength training and programming. This course will introduce key principles of resistance training and conditioning to maximize strength, speed, cardiovascular and flexibility training based on concepts learned in physiology, anatomy, kinesiology and psychology. Pre-requisites: BIO 230 and HFS 310 or HFS 320.

HFS 360 ISSUES IN COACHING (3)
This course examines the various issues both past and present that today's coach, both at the interscholastic and intercollegiate level, will have to deal with. The importance of program organization and philosophy formation will be studied as it relates to dealing with issues.

HFS 375 SPORT AND ADMINISTRATION MANAGEMENT PRACTICES II (3)
This course will provide students with extensive discussions of the foundational aspects of the profession and current topics from the field. Throughout the course, students will discuss the significance of sport as an international social institution. Students will learn the relevance of sociological, cultural, historical, political and psychological concepts to the management of sport. Students will learn the necessary professional skills and attitudes of sport managers and ways in which the globalization of sport continues to affect sport management professions.

HFS 385 INTERNSHIP (1-15)
On-site experiences with an agency that delivers leisure services. This may include public recreation park agencies, voluntary or social agencies, correctional institutions, industries, therapeutic agencies, serving persons with disabilities or commercial recreation opportunities. Approval of department chair and instructor for non-recreation majors.

HFS 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4)
Individual readings, research and/or field study of a recreation issue, problem, service system or activity pattern. Can include individual growth of the student in a particular area. Approval of department chair and instructor for non-recreation majors.

HIS 180 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF HISTORY (3)
This course is designed to function as an introduction to the study of history at the college level. It will acquaint entry-level majors with the fundamentally interpretative nature of the historical enterprise, the use and evaluation of primary documents, the basic elements of historical research and writing and other skills and approaches integral to a successful undergraduate experience in the major. No prerequisite.

HIS 200 FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (3)
A chronological overview of American history from exploration and colonization through the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on the growth and development of American society.

HIS 201 THE MAKING OF CONTEMPORARY AMERICA (3)
A chronological survey of American history from Reconstruction through the 1980s. Emphasis is placed on the impact of industrialization, growth of the United States as a world power and the development of state capitalism.

HIS 210, WORLD HISTORY I, GLOBAL FOUNDATIONS (3)
A survey of world history from the Agricultural Revolution through the Age of European Expansion. Focus will be on the origins of the nonwestern societies and their cross-cultural interactions.

HIS 212, WORLD HISTORY II, THE AGE OF GLOBAL CONTACT (3)
A survey of world history from the Age of European Expansion through post-Colonialism and globalization. Focus will be on the rise of Imperialism, Capitalism and Revolution in a globalized world.

HIS 225 HISTORY: THEORY AND APPLICATION (3)
For majors and interested nonmajors, this course combines a focus on historical methodology with its application in local archival sources. A variety of themes and topics are considered, including great controversies, philosophies of history and the relationship of the historian to society. Having surveyed some key historiographical concepts, students then turn to the practice of social history, applying the emphasis and research methods of social historians to sources in local history.

HIS 245 REGIONAL AND NATIONAL STUDIES (3)
A specialized course of study on a particular topic or civilization significant in world history. Course topics may include Russia, Latin America, Canada, the Middle East, Africa, China and the Far East, etc. Announcement of the course topic is made prior to registration. May be taken more than once with different topics.

HIS 252 OHIO AND THE OLD NORTHWEST (3)
A selective study of important themes in Ohio and regional history beginning with the Mound-builders and extending through the period of colonization, Indian removal, the Civil War and the 20th century. Opportunities for individual exploration into local history are provided and field trips supplement lectures, readings and discussion. Offered alternate years.

HIS 253 AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (3)
A study of some selected major social and intellectual movements in American history from early settlements until recent years. Topics could include Puritanism, the First and Second Great Awakenings, reform movements, Social Darwinism, racism, imperialism, secularization, fundamentalism/evangelicalism, the Social Gospel movement, emerging urban problems or changing gender roles. Particular attention is paid to developing intellectual currents and the socio-historical background that informed them. Offered every third year.

HIS 265 EUROPEAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (3)
A study of the social and intellectual movements in European civilization in the modern period. Topics such as social life, religious activity, literary themes, the impact of science, the interaction of historical events and intellectual development, and the advent of technological civilization are considered. Recommended background in European history.

HIS 271 HISTORY OF NORTHERN IRELAND AND BACKGROUND TO THE TROUBLES (3)
This course covers Modern Irish History from 1800-1923. Class topics include: Daniel O'Connell and his campaigns for Catholic Emancipation for Repeal of the Union; social, economic and demographic problems in pre-famine Ireland and the Great Famine and its impact on Irish society; emigration from Ireland in the course of the 19th century; the campaign for Home Rule under Butt, Parnell, Redmond and Dillon; the land problem and its resolution and the end of landlordism; the Easter Rebellion and its political consequences. It focuses also upon the political issues and events out of which the Troubles arose in the l960s and early l970s. 

HIS 301 STUDIES IN AMERICAN HISTORY (3)
A specialized course of study focusing upon a significant theme or topic in American history, such as African-American history. Recommended background in American history. May be taken more than once with different topics.

HIS 302 STUDIES IN EUROPEAN HISTORY (3)
A specialized course of study focusing upon a significant theme or topic in European history. Recommended background in European history. May be taken more than once with different topics.

HIS 305 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY (3)
A chronological survey of African American history from early colonial period through the civil rights struggles of the 1960s and 1970s. It begins by exploring the arrival of slavery and examining the problem that slavery posited in colonial life. The course moves on to examine the development of slavery in its classic form in antebellum America, with particular focus on different historo-graphical approaches, before moving on to survey African American life in the Jim-Crow south and the creation of segregation. Finally, the course concludes with a careful treatment of the great migration of rural blacks to the urban north and then an analysis of the freedom struggles of the later 20th century.

HIS 310 U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY (3)
A chronological survey of U.S. women's history from the 17th to the 20th century. Primary themes throughout the course include work and family, class and race, public and private, and religion and politics. Examines how women's history and status have been defined by these categories and how each has changed over time and differed for women from diverse cultures and communities. This course may be taken as part of the Women's Studies minor.

HIS 312, EUROPEAN WOMEN'S HISTORY (3)
This course will survey European Women's lives from the High Middle Ages through the Early Modern Period. Students will discuss the ways that religious, political and cultural authorities controlled women as well as the ways that women exercised agency within those restrictions. The course will examine the diversity and similarity of women's experiences depending on their age, social status, religion, country of origin or time. This course may be taken as part of the Women's Studies minor.

HIS 320 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (3)
This course offers a chronological survey of the causes, course and impact of the American Civil War and the Era of Reconstruction that occurred in its wake. A variety of related topics and themes will be considered, included key military developments, the particular impact of the war on American gender and race relations, and the war as a major step in the development of total war. In addition, the course will survey the dramatic postwar political and social events emanating from the emancipation of four million slaves. The course includes one overnight field trip to a battlefield. No prerequisite.

HIS 350 RESEARCH SEMINAR (3)
A course providing practice in research and writing using primary source materials. The course focuses on research methodology and the preparation of a seminar paper. A common theme in either American or European history is selected each year, and individual student research findings are shared. For juniors and seniors. Topic alternates between American and European history. May be taken more than once with different topics. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 120.

HIS 359 MENNONITE HISTORY AND THOUGHT (3)
The course surveys the history and meaning of Mennonitism from its inception to the present. Topics may include Mennonite origins in the Anabaptist Reformation of the 16th century, Mennonites in colonial North America, the movement westward with the frontier, the Quickening of the 19th century, the schisms of the 19th and 20th centuries, the impact of such American phenomena as revivalism and fundamentalism on Mennonite thought, the Mennonite response to war and the character of Mennonite theology. Emphases on particular topics may vary from one term to another. Prerequisite: REL 273 or permission of instructor. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor. Cross-listed as REL 359.

HIS 380 HISTORY INTERNSHIP (2-4)
A supervised work/study experience with a historical society, museum, archives or other institution providing an opportunity to apply classroom learning through research, planning exhibits, organizing collections or other "public history" activities.

HIS 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY (1-4)
By arrangement; topic to be proposed by the student.

HUM 221, 222 HUMANITIES 1, 2 (3 each)
The humanities courses are interdisciplinary in character, drawing on the disciplines of history, English, philosophy, art and music. The sequence examines the history of Western civilization to the present and acquaints students with questions of fundamental human concern such as: What dynamic has shaped western civilization? What is the "good life?" What is the "good society?" How should individuals think in terms of their relationship to God, the state, other people? Are individuals responsible for their actions? Music and art history are used to illustrate important cultural themes. The student, it is hoped, will acquire an intelligent frame of reference for Western civilization and confront important issues related to human values.

HUM 221, the first course in the sequence, begins with origins of civilization and follows the history of the West through the Renaissance. The second course in the sequence begins with the Reformation and follows the history of Western civilization up to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or 120..

LAS 050 APPLIED COLLEGE SKILLS (3) (only 2 count toward graduation)
This course stresses reading and writing comprehension and skills. Students learn how to gain support from instructors and classmates, increase knowledge and improve skills needed for success in college, and are helped in their transition to college. The student must earn a grade of C- or above in order to be eligible to enroll for the following semester.

LAS 105 BECOMING A SCHOLAR (3)
This course will help students learn and embody the practices of being a scholar in the context of Bluffton's academic and faith community. Students will develop essential elements of their academic identity through readings and conversations about Bluffton's four enduring values and by constructing a course project. This course is required of all first-year students during the fall semester of the first year. All students who earn an E must retake the course during the following spring semester. Those who earn a D may retake it during the spring semester.

LAS 140 PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT (2)
This course guides students in preparing a portfolio for submission for college credit based on learning occurring outside the college or university environment.

LAS 205 VOLUNTARY SERVICE
Students who have participated in voluntary service for a significant period of time prior to attending college or during their college career may apply for academic credit for this experience. Maximum credit granted 12 semester hours.

LAS 301 ISSUES IN MODERN AMERICA (3)
Thematic approach to current problems in U.S. society. The goals of the course are to help students understand the complexity of issues, to see how various disciplines analyze problems and arrive at solutions, to learn to read critically and sensitively and to consider ethical implications of the way society chooses to deal with the issues. Prerequisite: 15 hours of general education credit.

LAS 342 CROSS-CULTURAL EXPERIENCE (4)
This course develops a framework for understanding and appreciating diversity and different cultures and provides a cross-cultural learning experience. Through this experience of immersion in another geographic and cultural setting, students are expected to 1) more fully understand and appreciate a culture other than their own and then reflect critically upon their own location within their cultural context, and 2) examine what it means to be a responsible citizen in the global community and grow in developing an ethic of justice, service and peacemaking. Normally completed during the student's sophomore or junior year.

LAS 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY
(variable number of hours)

LAS 400 CHRISTIAN VALUES IN A GLOBAL COMMUNITY (3)
Provides a forum for interdisciplinary examinations of ethics, community and the environment. Using a seminar format, it aims to help develop a framework for practicing global citizenship as informed by the peace church tradition. Designed to serve as the capstone for Bluffton University's general education curriculum, this course asks students to integrate their liberal arts studies, cross-cultural experiences and disciplinary perspectives in order to find ethical responses to community problems. Prerequisites: LAS 301 or EDU 332, LAS 342 and senior status.

MAT 050 BASIC MATHEMATICS (3) (only 2 count toward graduation)
Students review and apply basic computational and algebraic concepts and skills. Problem solving is a major focus of the course, including basic applications to geometry. Graphing calculators are provided and used throughout the course whenever appropriate.

MAT 100 COLLEGE ALGEBRA (3)
This course presents concepts and skills typically found in a college algebra course including development of real number systems, simplifying algebraic expressions, solving equations and inequalities, and solving mathematical problems that model real world situations. Numerical, algebraic and graphical representations are used throughout the course. Graphing calculators are required and are used to accommodate numerical and graphical solution techniques in addition to traditional paper and pencil methods. Prerequisites: MAT 050 or two years of high school mathematics and qualification for placement.

MAT 105 UNDERSTANDING NUMERICAL DATA (2)
Designed to help students understand, interpret and think critically about numerical information. The main focus of the course is concept development rather than mathematical manipulation. Use of graphing calculators and spreadsheets give students experience in handling numerical data. Prerequisites: MAT 050 or placement into MAT 100 or above.

MAT 114 PRECALCULUS (4)
A study of families of elementary functions and their important properties power functions, polynomials, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their inverses. Numerical, algebraic and graphical representations of each family are included. Polya s problem-solving methods are used to solve mathematical problems that model real-world situations. Graphing calculators are required and are used extensively. Prerequisites: three years high school math and qualification for placement.

MAT 115 BUSINESS CALCULUS (3)
A study of functions and applied differential calculus for economics, business and other social sciences. Emphasis is on spreadsheet analysis of common elementary situations. Other topics covered include systems of linear equations and an introduction to linear programming. Prerequisite MAT 100 or placement into MAT 114 or above.

MAT 135 CALCULUS 1 (5)
A study of fundamental concepts and applications of the differential calculus of one variable, as well as introductory integral calculus. Polya s problem-solving methods are used to solve mathematical problems that model real-world situations and which require methods of differential calculus for their solution. The historical roles of Newton and Leibniz are discussed. Graphing calculators are required and are used extensively. Projects that require use of computer algebra systems such as Mathematica or Maple are included. Prerequisites: MAT 114 or four years of high school math and qualification for placement.

MAT 136 CALCULUS 2 (5)
The fundamental concept and applications of the definite integral of one variable, infinite series and introductory differential equations including series solutions are included. Polya's problem-solving methods are applied to solve mathematical problems that model real-world situations and which require methods of integral calculus for their solution. The historical roles of Newton and Leibniz are discussed. Graphing calculators are required and are used extensively. Projects that require use of computer algebra systems such as Mathematica or Maple are included. Prerequisites: MAT 135 or its equivalent.

MAT 185 FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS CONCEPTS FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD (3)
This course includes pre-number ideas, early number concepts, numeration systems, place value foundations and applications, understanding the basic algorithms of arithmetic, techniques of estimation, problem solving methods, basic concepts of geometry and measurement. Calculators and their role in mathematical problem solving are included from the perspective of learning to judge the most effective approach to a problem estimation, mental calculation, paper and pencil or calculator. Prerequisites: MAT 050 or readiness for college algebra (or higher) on mathematics placement, EDU 200, EDU 205, PSY 110.

MAT 186 FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS CONCEPTS FOR MIDDLE CHILDHOOD (3)
This course includes the content of integers and fractions, rational and irrational numbers, decimal notation, ratio and percent, equations and inequalities, probability and motions in geometry. Calculators and their role in mathematical problem solving are included from the perspective of learning to judge the most effective approach to a problem estimation, mental calculation, paper and pencil or calculator. Prerequisite: MAT 185.

MAT 211 INTRODUCTORY GEOMETRY (3)
A study of classical theorems from plane Euclidean geometry. Discovery methods and inductive reasoning are used with a computer geometry program as a tool to discover relationships. Four proof methods vector, analytical, synthetic and transformation are compared and contrasted as discovered relationships are proven. The historical contributions of Greek, Indian, Arab and European mathematicians are discussed, particularly those of Euclid, Pythagoras, Desargues, Pappus, Archimedes, Ptolemy, Heron, Brahmagupta, Bhaskara, Fermat, Poincare, Ceva, Minkowski, Steiner and Feuerbach. Prerequisite: MAT 136.

MAT 220 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (3)
This course introduces the student to general methods of discrete mathematics on topics selected from sets, relations and functions, graphs, trees, matching problems, counting techniques and recurrence. An algorithmic approach to problem solving is a common thread that ties these various topics together. Historical contributions of mathematics to graph theory and discrete mathematics are discussed, particularly those of Cantor, Euler, Fibonacci, Hamilton, Gauss, Boole and Russell. Prerequisite: qualification for placement at the calculus level.

MAT 225 MULTIVARIATE CALCULUS (3)
A development of vector calculus, partial derivatives and multiple integrals, properties of vectors and transformations on coordinate systems, line and surface integrals, and projects that make use of systems such as Mathematica or Maple for three-dimensional display is included throughout the course. Prerequisite: MAT 136.

MAT 230 LINEAR ALGEBRA (3)
A study of vector spaces and subspaces, linear transformations, matrices and determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. Real world problems are modeled and solved using whatever methods are appropriate paper and pencil, graphing calculator or computer algebra systems. Prerequisite: MAT 136.

MAT 277 ALGEBRA: FUNCTIONS AND MODELING (3)
This course includes topics related to the NCTM K-8 curriculum in algebra, number theory, data analysis and problem solving. Mathematics is presented using a variety of pedagogical methods including discussion in groups, cooperative learning groups and individual and group investigation of mathematical content. One goal of the course is to make students secure in their ability to be independent learners of mathematical content. Prerequisite: MAT 185 or consent of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

MAT 312 ADVANCED GEOMETRY (3)
This course uses a formal axiomatic development to study both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. The course includes a significant amount of mathematical history particularly as the discovery of non-Euclidean geometry relates to the development of modern mathematics of the past century. Formal proof is a major focus of this course. Prerequisite: MAT 211. Offered alternate years.

MAT 332 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA (3)
A study of groups and rings using properties of sets, equivalence relations and number theory. Historical contributions of mathematicians to number theory and algebra are discussed, particularly those of Diophantus, Fermat, Euler, Lagrange, Abel, Cayley, Cauchy, Galois, Jordan, Noether, Germain, Artin, Dedekind and Sylow. Prerequisite: MAT 230. Offered alternate years.

MAT 340 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (3)
A study of the theory of probability and inferential statistics, including both discrete and continuous probability distributions. The distributions studied include the binomial, geometric, Poisson, normal, gamma, exponential, chi-square, t and F distributions. Includes random sampling, estimation theory, unbiased estimators and some study of tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation. Historical contributions of mathematicians to probability and statistics are discussed, particularly those of Bayes, Bernoulli, Chebyshev, Gauss and Poisson. Prerequisite: MAT 136; MAT 225 recommended.

MAT 350 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND MODELING (3)
A study of differential equations generated from modeling nature and the physical world using analytic, numeric and graphical techniques. The course begins with the study of elementary differential equations and introductory models in classroom and computer laboratory settings, then more complex general mathematical models are introduced. Calculator and computer technology are used extensively. Group and individual projects are required. Prerequisite: MAT 136. Offered alternate years.

MAT 360 OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3)
A study of introductory topics in operations research: linear programming, integer programming, network models and applications to the transportation problem and the Program Evaluation and Review Technique, Markov chains, queuing theory and simulation. Computer technology is used extensively. Group and individual projects are required. Prerequisite: MAT 230. Offered alternate years.

MAT 380 MATHEMATICS AND METHODS SEMINAR (2)
This course includes both contents and methods. Content topics discussed are ones that can be adapted to either elementary or secondary levels and relate to "mathematics enrichment." The course also includes discussion of professional behavior topics and students study the K-12 reform curriculum of the NCTM standards, the integrated mathematics curriculum vs. the traditional mathematics curriculum, other current trends in mathematics education, and the future of mathematics education. In addition the course includes selected topics from the history of mathematics.

MAT 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MATHEMATICS (2-5) (By arrangement)
Two courses of independent study in mathematics are required for graduation with honors in mathematics; also available by proposal from any student majoring in mathematics.

MAT 401 ANALYSIS I (3)
This course is intended as a first course in analysis following multivariate calculus. The study of sets, sequences and mappings becomes a foundation for more theoretical study of real and complex analysis. Topics included are countable, connected, open and closed sets, convergence of sequences, continuity and uniform continuity, and a first investigation of metric spaces, separability and compactness. Prerequisite: MAT 225. Offered alternate years.
Computer Science courses

MGT 354 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (3)
A study of management of the modern firm based on the classic managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading and control with an emphasis on using team-based learning structures. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120, and ECN 141 and ECN 142 and junior status.

MGT 355 PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)
The study of management issues and analytical problem-solving techniques in the areas of operations and manufacturing management. Prerequisite: MGT 354. Offered alternate years.

MGT 359 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)
This course brings together, examines and develops the knowledge required to successfully organize, create and manage a business endeavor. The student will explore the feasibility of an idea through the use of a business plan with measured results. Prerequisites: ACT 152, MGT 354 and MKT 356 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

MGT 364 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)
The study of the personnel field in the modern organization, dealing with the areas of recruitment, training, employee relations, compensation, health and safety and separation. In addition, the impact of government regulations and the demands of society will be analyzed. Prerequisite: MGT 354 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

MGT 370 ISSUES IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT (3)
The course explores a range of issues faced by organizations that deliver health care services. These issues include responding to state and federal funding initiatives, utilization of new technology, implementation of universal medical records as well as other issues that may be identified by the students.

MGT 380 CORPORATE STRATEGY (3)
This senior capstone course requires the student to synthesize what has been learned in the separate functional fields of business. Students will utilize knowledge from previous course work in business, strengthen oral and written communication skills, develop critical thinking ability and develop the ability to work in groups. A major portion of the class will be devoted to case studies in business. Prerequisites: MGT 354, MKT 356, FIN 366 and senior standing, or permission of the instructor.

MKT 325 E-COMMERCE (3)
This course will provide an understanding of the technical skills, the business concepts and strategies and the social issues surrounding one of the fastest growing areas of the Internet. The course will explore the impact the Internet has made regarding the exchange of goods and services, the organizational form and legal issues. It will also explore the problems created by electronic commerce such as privacy, security, intellectual property and legal liability issues. Offered alternate years.
Prerequisite: ECN 141 or TEC 200 or TEC 250.

MKT 356 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3)
An examination of the functions of marketing and marketing institutions with emphasis on market structures and pricing, distribution channels and the management of marketing function. Prerequisites: ECN 141 and ECN 142 and junior status.

MKT 357 MARKETING RESEARCH (3)
An introduction to information gathering, research design, sampling techniques, data collection processes and analysis of data used in marketing decisions. Prerequisites: MKT 356 and BUS 284. Offered alternate years.

MKT 358 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3)
Consumer behavior is the study of the decision-making process involved in acquiring, consuming and disposing of goods, services, experiences and ideas. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: ECN 141.

MKT 360 SALES (3)
An introduction to sales techniques, cases, sales management, recruiting, evaluation and control within the marketing environment. Prerequisite: MKT 356. Offered alternate years.

MKT 362 ADVERTISING (3)
An introduction to the field of advertising and its relationship to marketing. Consideration is given to all facets of an advertising campaign. Areas covered include: target marketing methods, basic media selection, promotion, creativity and production. Prerequisite: MKT 356. Offered alternate years.

MKT 363 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)
Covers marketing decision-making and interaction among different function areas of marketing to better develop marketing strategies that define target markets and build a marketing mix. Prerequisites: MGT 354 and MKT 356 and senior standing.

MKT 376 BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE (3)
This course will explore ways to collect, interpret and utilize marketing data. Contemporary issues including data mining and data warehousing will be explored. The students will utilize practical software applications such as Microsoft Access and design a practical business intelligence model for a business or non profit organization. Prerequisites: TEC 102 and MKT 356. Offered alternate years.

MUS 005 MUSIC THEATRE WORKSHOP (.5)
Preparation and performance of staged opera and musical theatre works, both in their entirety and in excerpts. Conscientious rehearsal and performance attendance is expected to maintain membership.

MUS 010 CHAMBER MUSIC -01 (.5), -02 (0)
Small instrumental (e.g. Flute Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, Brass Quartet, String Quartet) and vocal ensembles which perform varied repertoire both on and off campus. Ensembles are formed based on student interest. Conscientious rehearsal and performance attendance is expected to maintain membership.

MUS 021 CONCERT BAND -01 (.5), -02 (0)
The Concert Band consists of traditional woodwind, brass and percussion instrumentation, which performs a varied repertoire at several on-campus performances each year. Membership is open to any campus/community instrumentalist desirous of playing. Conscientious rehearsal and performance attendance is expected to maintain membership.

MUS 022 JAZZ ENSEMBLE -01 (.5), -02 (0)
A select ensemble which studies and performs music in various contemporary popular idioms, including jazz improvisation. Membership based on auditions; conscientious rehearsal and performance attendance is expected to maintain membership.

MUS 023 LIMA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA -01 (.5)
A semi-professional community orchestra which performs a series of nine concerts each year. One three-hour rehearsal per week. Audition required. Conscientious rehearsal and performance attendance is expected to maintain membership.

MUS 024 UNIVERSITY CHORALE -01 (.5), -02(0)
The University Chorale is a large mixed ensemble focused on diverse repertoire including global, contemporary and traditional sacred and secular music. This group participates in both on- and off-campus performances and special events and is open to all students. Conscientious rehearsal and performance attendance is expected to maintain membership.

MUS 033 CAMERATA SINGERS -01 (.5), -02 (0)
The Camerata Singers is a select chamber choir which performs primarily sacred music in concert performances both on-campus and in the region. This ensemble tours extensively. Much of its varied repertoire is performed a cappella. Conscientious rehearsal and performance attendance is expected to maintain membership.

MUS 034 CHORAL SOCIETY -01 (.5), -02 (0)
Choral Society performs a large choral/orchestra work each semester. The fall semester is the annual performance of Handel's Messiah. The spring semester performance is during the Bach Festival concert. Membership is open to any campus or community member. Conscientious rehearsal and performance attendance is expected to maintain membership.

MUS 035 GOSPEL CHOIR -01(.5), -02(0)
Open to all Bluffton University faculty, staff and students, as well the Bluffton community, this group will perform a wide variety of gospel music and spirituals in several on-campus performances per year.

MUS 100 MUSIC RECITAL/LAB (0 P/F)
Development of musical skills through the experience of at least 10 live musical performances and regularly scheduled conducting labs each semester. Music majors are required to enroll in MUS 100 each semester until graduation.

APPLIED MUSIC PRIVATE INSTRUCTION (1-2)
Individual instruction with emphasis on developing technical proficiency, a repertoire representative of the literature for the particular instrument or voice and a knowledge of performance styles and practices. Performance in studio and departmental recitals. (One hour credit for one half-hour lesson per week; may also be taken for two hours credit for one hour lesson per week.) Music lessons can not be audited. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

MUS 101 Piano
MUS 103 Strings
MUS 105 Voice
MUS 106 Organ
MUS 107 Brass
MUS 108 Percussion
MUS 109 Woodwinds
MUS 110 Guitar
MUS 120 Composition
MUS 144 Conducting

MUS 112 BEGINNING GUITAR CLASS (1)
A course to develop facility on the guitar for practical use in the elementary classroom or for group singing. Basic chord progressions, strumming and picking techniques are covered.

MUS 113 STRING METHODS (2)
Development of adequate technical proficiency on all the orchestral string instruments violin, viola, cello and string bass with a view toward teaching the string program in public schools. Students are expected to gain adequate playing proficiency on the instruments consistent with a beginning/intermediate level. Study of methods, materials and assessment for teaching strings is included. Observation of teaching in culturally diverse settings required.

MUS 114 INTERMEDIATE GUITAR CLASS (1)
A continuation of MUS 112 with a development toward more solo playing skills. Prerequisite: MUS 112

MUS 116 VOICE METHODS (2)
Introduction to the understanding and production of vocal tone with an emphasis on developing healthy vocal proficiency and basic teaching and assessment skills. Specific areas of exploration include breathing, resonance, diction, vocal anatomy, languages and basic repertoire. Students are expected to gain solo performing proficiency at a beginning/intermediate level. Observation of teaching in a culturally diverse setting required.

MUS 117 BRASS METHODS (2)
Introduction to the techniques, including notation and transposition, of trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium and tuba, with an emphasis on developing teaching skills. Students are expected to gain adequate playing proficiency on the instruments consistent with a beginning/intermediate level. A survey of methods, materials and assessment appropriate for teaching in public schools is included. Observation of teaching in a culturally diverse setting required.

MUS 118 PERCUSSION METHODS (2)
Development of adequate technical proficiency on the basic percussion instruments snare drum, timpani, and xylophone with a view toward teaching in public schools. Students are expected to gain adequate playing proficiency on the instruments consistent with a beginning/intermediate level. Study of methods, materials and assessment available for teaching is included. Observation of teaching in a culturally diverse setting required.

MUS 119 WOODWIND METHODS (3)
Development of adequate technical proficiency on all the major woodwind instruments flute, Bb clarinet, oboe, bassoon, and alto saxophone with a view toward teaching in public schools. Students are expected to gain adequate playing proficiency on the instruments consistent with a beginning/intermediate level. Study of notation and transposition for woodwind instruments as well as methods, materials and assessment for teaching is included. Observation of teaching in a culturally diverse setting required.

MUS 120 APPLIED COMPOSITION PRIVATE INSTRUCTION (1-2)
This course is designed for students interested in learning about music composition in more depth. Individual instruction is given to develop the skills necessary for composing in various genres and styles. (One hour credit for one half-hour lesson per week; may also be taken for two hours credit for one hour lesson per week.) This course may not be audited.

MUS 121, 122 FUNCTIONAL PIANO 1, 2 (1/1)
This two-course series is for music majors with little or no keyboard background and is designed to introduce and develop skills necessary to pass the piano proficiency examination.

MUS 135 INTRO TO MUSIC (3)
This course examines music from a variety of perspectives. The first perspective is as an introduction to music fundamentals, stressing note reading, rhythm, recognizing and understanding major and minor scales, intervals, triads and seventh chords. The second perspective is as a performer, with an introduction to basic guitar chords and strummed accompaniments, percussion instruments and simple piano skills. The third perspective is as a listener, with basic ear-training and exploration of music literature, using examples from pop, folk, classical, jazz, blues and world music. This course fulfills the general education fine arts requirement and the first course of the music theory sequence.

MUS 136 WORLD MUSIC (3)
This course examines various world cultures through the lens of their specific musical practices and customs. Students will discover the fundamentals of music in a global perspective and will explore how music functions in several specific cultures and societies: practically, socially, theologically, ideologically and/or politically. Hands-on music-making, observation and multimedia experiences will complement lectures and discussions to create a holistic understanding of music's varying cultural roles. This course fulfills the general education fine arts requirement.

MUS 140 EXPLORE MUSIC (3)
This course will explore different topics in music. It may focus on a particular style or approach to music such as American Popular Music since 1870 (folk, jazz, blues, country, tin pan alley, hip hop and indie) or History of Rock and Roll since 1950 (studying rock and roll styles, gospel, country, jazz and blues). Topics will vary according to the instructor or current interest that may relate to the civic engagement theme. This course fulfills the general education fine arts requirement.

MUS 141 BEGINNING CONDUCTING (2)
An introduction to manual conducting skills and baton technique with emphasis on basic beat patterns, cueing, expression, fermatas and independence of right and left hands. The course also includes instruction in score reading, analysis and preparation, utilizing basic four part instrumental and vocal literature. Students function as ensemble members and as conductors.

MUS 147, 205 AURAL SKILLS 1, 2 (2/2)
A two-course series to develop aural skills including sight-singing, melodic dictation and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite for MUS 147: MUS 135. Corequisite for MUS 147: MUS 148. Prerequisite for MUS 205: MUS 147 and MUS 148. Corequisite for MUS 205: MUS 206.

MUS 148 MUSIC THEORY 1 (2)
A continuation of MUS 135 Intro to Music, this course focuses on music fundamentals with emphasis on written theory, including part writing and harmonic analysis, supplemented by keyboard harmony. Prerequisite: MUS 135. Corequisite: MUS 147.

MUS 206 MUSIC THEORY 2 (2)
A continuation of MUS 148 with emphasis on chromatic harmony and formal structures of Western music. Development of aural skills, including melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation, as well as sight-singing. Corequisite: MUS 205.

MUS 207 MUSIC THEORY 3 (3)
A continuation of MUS 206 with emphasis on chromatic harmony of the 19th and 20th centuries. Development of aural skills, including melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation, as well as sight-singing. Prerequisites: MUS 205 and MUS 206.

MUS 212 ELECTRONIC MUSIC, INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT (2)
An introduction to electronic MIDI instruments and computer applications in music. Designed to provide familiarity with hardware, software and functions of microcomputers appropriate for use in the public school classroom.

MUS 231 MUSIC MINISTRY (2)
A practical study of methods and materials for the church musician. The course includes study and projects in hymnology, church choir repertoire, instruments in worship and administration of a church music program. Not offered every year REL 230 is a recommended prerequisite. Cross-listed as REL 231.

MUS 241 ADVANCED CONDUCTING (3)
A continuation of MUS 141 with emphasis on expressive techniques, analysis/interpretation and critical listening and communication skills. Special topics include contemporary conducting innovations, rehearsal methodology, professional resources and historical styles/content.

MUS 300 JUNIOR RECITAL (0 P/F)
Demonstration of achievement in applied music study during the junior year. Students present approximately 20 minutes of representative repertoire in their major applied area in a group recital.

MUS 303 ORCHESTRATION, COMPOSITION AND ARRANGING (3)
A study of the techniques of scoring for the instruments of the band and orchestra as well as voices. Students write and realize arrangements and/or original compositions for homogeneous groups (string, woodwind, brass, percussion, voice) for the study of range, transposition, clef manipulation and notation. Analysis of techniques of selected Classical, Romantic and modern composers included. Specific orchestration, arranging and composition projects are completed at appropriate times during the semester. Prerequisite: MUS 207. Offered as needed.

MUS 311 PIANO PEDAGOGY ELEMENTARY METHODS (2)
A course dealing with the issues facing the prospective piano teacher, i.e., studio setup and policies, financial considerations, professional organizations, etc. Also includes an extensive survey of beginning piano pedagogical materials for children and adults. Offered as needed.

MUS 312 PIANO PEDAGOGY INTERMEDIATE, ADVANCED METHODS (2)
A course dealing with piano teaching materials for the intermediate and advanced student as well as a study of college audition requirements and a review of college class piano materials. Offered as needed.

MUS 313 VOCAL PEDAGOGY (2)
A survey of materials, repertoire and teaching methods for both individual and class instruction in singing. Offered as needed.

MUS 321, 322 MUSIC HISTORY 1, 2 (3/3)
These two courses comprise a survey of Western music literature and styles. Music History 1 covers the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque periods; Music History 2 continues through the Classical and Romantic periods through the end of the 20th century. The courses include development of and exercises in listening skills, analytical skills and music research technique. Music History 2 also includes an introduction to non-Western musical styles. Writing-enriched courses. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120, MUS 207.

MUS 329 MUSIC TEACHING METHODS: EARLY CHILDHOOD (3)
A study of the methods, materials, techniques, organization and the assessment of learning activities related to music in elementary schools combining the theoretical and practical. In addition, such topics as inclusion of students with differing learning needs, multiculturalism, classroom management, Orff/Kodaly techniques and administrative procedures are addressed. Prerequisites: MUS 147 and MUS 148.

MUS 340 MARCHING BAND METHODS (2)
A comprehensive course in design and teaching of marching band shows. The course covers writing pre-game drill, contest drill and show drill. Also covered are methods of teaching and cleaning drill and fundamental marching. Students use Pyware 3D Drill Design software to write their drill. Offered as needed.

MUS 350 MUSIC TEACHING METHODS: INSTRUMENTAL (3)
A course for the prospective secondary school music teacher dealing with methods, materials, techniques, organization and the assessment of learning activities related to instrumental music, combining the theoretical and practical. A study of techniques for scoring, composition and arranging instrumental music is also included in the course. Prerequisites: MUS 147 and MUS 148.

MUS 352 MUSIC TEACHING METHODS: CHORAL AND GENERAL MUSIC (3)
A course for the prospective secondary school music teacher dealing with methods, materials, techniques, organization and the assessment of learning activities related to choral/vocal music and the general music classroom, combining the theoretical and practical. A study of techniques for scoring, composition and arranging choral music is also included in the course. Prerequisites: MUS 147 and MUS 148.

MUS 395 MUSIC LITERATURE (2)
A survey of literature appropriate for a specific musical instrument. The study of literature is used to enhance future teaching and performance of the instrument. Music literature from various time periods and styles, as well as difficulty levels involved with the performance of the literature, is studied. Offered as needed.

MUS 400 SENIOR RECITAL (0 P/F)
Demonstration of achievement in applied music study during the senior year. Students present a full recital (approximately 1 hour) of representative repertoire in their major applied area. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MUS 300.

MUS 401 MUSIC SEMINAR (2)
This capstone course involves an in-depth study of a major musical work, including its historical context, an analysis of the forms and techniques employed and applicable performance practices. The course also includes study of current issues and events in music and the arts in our society. The course includes a major research project. Prerequisite: MUS 322.

MUS 402 MUSIC PRACTICUM (1-2)
A supervised work-study experience consistent with students' area of emphasis (music business, church music, music education, piano pedagogy). Sections: 01 Music Business, 02 Music Ministry, 03 Music Education, 04 Piano Pedagogy. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and permission of the faculty supervisor.

NSC 105 THE CHEMISTRY OF EVERYTHING (3)
The elements of chemistry will be explored, with an emphasis on "household chemistry" involving materials that might be found at home. Topics to be covered include acid-base and oxidation-reduction chemistry, organic and inorganic chemistry, and how chemists move between the macroscopic and microscopic. Environmentally relevant topics will be integrated into the discussion.

NSC 106 HUMAN BIOLOGY TODAY (3)
This course covers issues related to human biology. Possible topics emphasized include genetics and genetic engineering, how humans fit into the historical scheme of life, human variation, human health and nutrition, the systems of the human body, cell division and cancer, human population dynamics, immerging infectious diseases and human impact on the Earth's ecosystems. The specific topics emphasized may vary from term to term.

NSC 107 THE SCIENCE OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE (3)
This course offers insight into the science behind our current understanding of the Earth's climate system both past and present. By examining the workings of Earth's climate, students are offered insight into the potential for current human activities to alter climate with its biological and economic consequences. The major topics covered include an explanation of the current functioning of Earth's climate and its impact on biota. We also investigate long term fluctuations in climate driven by orbital factors, shorter term fluctuations (glacial events) and recorded/historical climate changes. The relationships between climate and flora, fauna and human activity is examined. Throughout, the presentation includes the history of science, present day understandings of science, linkages between branches of science and the impact of scientific knowledge on humankind. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

NSC 109 ENERGY (3)
One of the most important challenges facing society in the 21st century involves the development of new ways to obtain energy from our environment and technologies to transform and use this energy. This course explores the topic of energy in many of its important forms. The course starts by examining the classical physics of energy. Various forms of potential and kinetic energy, such as motion, heat, light and electricity, and the energy of atoms are studied, as well as the theories and techniques of energy transformation. The course leads to an investigation of alternative energy sources, such as solar, biomass and wind power and will look at questions of sustainability, economics and societal impact of these new energy technologies.

NTR 105 INTRODUCTION TO FOODS (3)
This course provides an introduction to foods and food preparation within the context of societal concerns related to health and wellness. Lecture emphasizes the human ecological model and how environmental interaction has evolved and changed with time (food safety, biotechnology, food technology, food production, sustainable living). Lab emphasizes basic techniques of food preparation. (2 hrs. lecture; 3 hrs. lab). Suitable for majors and non-majors.

NTR 210 FOOD SCIENCE (4)
A study of scientific principles related to food and food preparation. This course promotes an understanding of the composition of food and food products and the principles of food preparation leading to palatability, maximum nutrient retention and food sanitation. Lecture and lab.

NTR 225 FUNDAMENTALS OF NUTRITION (3)
A study of the nutritional needs of the human body for good health. Specific attention is given to understanding the nutrients and their chemical characteristics, functions in the body and food sources. The nutritional requirements of the individual student are emphasized in an attempt to understand the relationship between diet and health. Suitable for non-majors.

NTR 240 PHYSICAL & NUTRITION ASSESSMENT (2)
Assessment of physical and nutritional status is key to providing appropriate health and wellness interventions. Anthropometry, biometry, clinical, and dietary assessment techniques will be utilized in assessment of health and wellness. Students will develop skills in physical and nutrition assessment techniques. Prerequisite: NTR 225.

NTR 245 CULTURAL FOODS (3)
This course examines the economic, social, cultural and consumer issues related to food and meals in today's society. Focus is on the translation of nutritional needs into food, menus and meals. Planning, purchasing, production and service of meals are accomplished through group participation. Prerequisite: NTR 110 or NTR 210. Lecture and lab.

NTR 250 NUTRITION EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION (2)
Principles and theories of learning, behavioral modification, cognitive theory, counseling theories and implementing and evaluating learning will be presented. Grounded in behavioral change models and theories, this course will provide students an opportunity to learn how to develop a nutrition counseling program for clients. Students will also become familiar with the ADIME model for standardized nutritional diagnosing utilizing case studies. Prerequisite: NTR 240.

NTR 284 SPECIAL STUDIES SEMINAR (1)
Study by tour of careers in food and nutrition. Class is by special arrangement of the faculty.

NTR 310 FOOD SERVICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (4)
A study of the organization and management of food service systems, principles and techniques of menu planning, quantity food purchasing, preparation and storage, budgeting, equipment use and layout, personnel management and sanitation. Prerequisite: NTR 110 or NTR 210. Lecture and field experience.

NTR 325 LIFECYCLE NUTRITION (3)
A study of nutrition related to critical periods throughout the life cycle. Nutritional needs during infancy, childhood, adolescence, athletics, pregnancy and in aging are included. Consideration is given to related physiological, psychological and socio-economic factors. Prerequisite: NTR 225.

NTR 335 PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION AND POLICY (3)
An overview of public health nutrition and the organization of public, private and non-profit community nutrition services. In addition, basic principles of epidemiology and the legislative policy making process is examined. Students utilize current information technologies. Offered fall semesters, odd years. Prerequisite: NTR 225.

NTR 351 RESEARCH IN FOODS AND NUTRITION (3)
A study of the basic research process as it applies to food and nutrition research. Qualitative and quantitative research will be studied, as well as analyzing and interpreting research publications. Students set up and conduct their own research using methods studied in this class. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120 and NTR 210.

NTR 375 MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY 1 (3.5)
A study of the nature and etiology of disease, the relationship of nutrition to health and disease processes and the use of nutrition therapy in the treatment of disease. The nutrition care process and state-of-the-art documentation methods will be utilized. Prerequisites: NTR 250 and BIO 231. Lecture plus clinical experience.

NTR 376 MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY 2 (3.5)
The second of a two-course sequence, this one continuing the study of nutritional management in the treatment of disease. The nutrition care process and state-of-the-art documentation methods will be utilized. Prerequisite: NTR 375. Lecture plus clinical experience.

NTR 385 INTERNSHIP (3-4)
Supervised work experience providing opportunity for application of principles and theory learned in the student's major course work. Internship objectives, contact hours, and specific requirements are to be arranged with supervising faculty prior to the course. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours of credit. Open to juniors and seniors.

NTR 386 ADVANCED NUTRITION (3)
This course provides an in-depth study of nutrients and their role in physiological processes. An analysis of selected topics in human nutrition with an emphasis on current research is also presented. Prerequisites: NTR 225 and BIO 231.

NTR 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
By arrangement.

NTR 400 SEMINAR IN WELLNESS (1)
A study of selected topics and professional development in the field of wellness. Not open to first-year students.

NTR 403 SEMINAR IN FOOD AND NUTRITION (1)
A course on the transition from student to professional, including information on internships, readying for employment, professional behavior, and other topics in food and nutrition. Open to senior majors only.

PCS 380 PROJECT (3)
An upper-level project involving the application of peace and conflict studies to the student's major. The project may be an internship, a practicum or an independent study. If the student's major includes a field work or internship component or a seminar, this project could be a part of such an experience, on approval of the PCS advisor and the faculty member supervising the major course. Offered on demand.

PHI 105 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3)
Introductory discussion of philosophical methods, ethics, knowledge, nature of reality and religious beliefs. Attention may be given to the philosophical dimensions of psychology, art and politics.

PHI 152 ETHICS (3)
Consideration of various ethical theories, issues in contemporary moral philosophy and moral issues in contemporary life. The student is challenged to clarify the basis of right and wrong conduct.

PHI 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHILOSOPHY (1-4)
By arrangement. Topic to be proposed by the student.

PHL 110 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH (3)
This course provides students with an overview of the field of public health and explores key challenges in public health.

PHL 310 GLOBAL HEALTH (3)
Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of global health, including: 1) how society and culture shape health, 2) ways of reducing morbidity and mortality, and 3) past and present global efforts to improve health.

PHL 320 EPIDEMIOLOGY (3)
Students will learn about the history of epidemiological research and how to apply the research designs commonly used by epidemiologists. Students will also learn how to read and evaluate health research articles.

PHL 410 FIELD PLACEMENT (2)
Students will experience the field of public health firsthand through a placement with a public health-related organization or individual. Students will demonstrate their mastery of public health concepts through the completion of a capstone project describing their placement experience or an independent project.

PHL 411 SOCIAL SCIENCES CAPSTONE (3)
Cross-listed as CRJ 411/PLS 411.

PHY 105 THE PHYSICAL WORLD (4)
This course is designed to introduce non-science majors to the fundamental concepts of physics. It also presents some earth and space science topics. Laboratory sessions give students hands-on experience, which illuminates topics explored in the lecture sessions. Throughout, the presentation includes the history of the science, the present-day understanding of the science and the impact of scientific knowledge on humankind. Prerequisite: MAT 050 or placement into MAT 100 or above.

PHY 202 ASTRONOMY (4)
An introductory course in astronomy. Lectures discuss sky cycles, astronomical tools, star evolution, galaxies, the solar system. Lab involves observation with naked eye, binoculars and telescopes. Three lectures, three hours of laboratory per week. The student must be flexible concerning lab time because observations are dependent upon weather and when the desired objects appear in the sky. Observations might be early evening, middle of the night or early morning. Prerequisites: one of the following: PHY 105, PHY 211, CEM 121 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

PHY 203 EARTH SCIENCE (4)
A survey course in geology/earth-science with emphasis on interpreting environment-shaping processes in terms of physical and chemical properties. Three lectures, one two-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: PHY 105, PHY 211, CEM 121 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

PHY 211 PHYSICS FOR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 1 (5)
The sequence PHY 211 and 212 form the standard year of calculus-based physics for science and engineering students. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, oscillations and waves, sound and light. Five lectures, two-hours of laboratory work per week. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120; students who have not had high-school physics, calculus or CEM 121 may wish to consult with the professor before attempting this course.

PHY 212 PHYSICS FOR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 2 (5)
The continuation of PHY 211. Five lectures, two-hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite: PHY 211.

PHY 213 PHYSICS 2: MIDDLE CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (3)
A continuation of PHY 211 with presentation tailored for students seeking middle-childhood licensure with science concentration. Prerequisite: PHY 211.

PHY 299 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS (credit varies)
By arrangement.

PHY 326 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 1 (5)
Cross-listed as CEM 326.

PHY 327 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 2 (5)
Cross-listed as CEM 327.

PHY 352 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS AND COMPUTERS (4)
Cross-listed as CPS 352.

PHY 360 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4)
Cross-listed as CEM 360.

PHY 365 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (3)
A study of Maxwell's equations and their applications. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: PHY 212, MAT 225, MAT 350. Offered on demand.

PHY 370 QUANTUM MECHANICS (3)
Formal development of the methods of quantum mechanics and its application to simple atomic and molecular systems. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: PHY 327. Offered on demand.

PHY 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHYSICS (1-3)
By arrangement. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in physics.

PLS 100 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE (3)
This course covers the scope and methods of the study of political science and examines the basic concepts and theories in the discipline. Traditions and approaches in the field and their application to the various subdivisions of political science are covered. Intended to help develop within the student the critical ability to analyze and evaluate political issues and questions.

PLS 251 AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS (3)
A study of the historical evolution of American political institutions. Appropriate attention is given to the theory of American federalism, constitutional safeguards, the political role of minorities and the contemporary challenges to democratic government.

PLS 272 GLOBAL POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3)
A study of international nation-state behavior since World War II. The course surveys political forces that operate in the contemporary international system such as ideology, nationalism, international law and economic interests. Selected current issues in international politics are identified for in-depth study and discussion. Such issues might include the Middle East conflict, the arms race, revolution in Central America, international development, protecting world resources, the struggle of Black Africa, nuclear proliferation and related issues. This course is one of the core courses in the Peace and Conflict Studies minor. Prerequisite: PLS 100 or PLS 215.

PLS 285 COMPARATIVE POLITICS (3)
An introductory course in comparative politics designed to introduce the student to the systematic study of nations and their political systems, to provide a solid base of information about political systems of selected countries and to develop analytical skills so that each student is able to compare any two nations with regard to political culture, political socialization, structure and institutions of government and public policy. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

PLS 301 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3)
This course utilizes a variety of perspectives and gives particular attention to the growth and development of the relationship between the individual and government at the federal, state and local levels. Offers an analysis of the historical evolution of the relationship between the states and the Bill of Rights and of the impact of the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the states. Provides a study of notable Supreme court decisions from Marbary and Madison to the leading decisions relating to the criminal justice system. Upper level standing and PLS 215 recommended for registration, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as CRJ 303.

PLS 411 Social Sciences Capstone (3)
Cross-listed as CRJ 411/PHL 411.

PSY 110 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the study of behavior covering the many and varied areas of psychological inquiry, including "world views," methodology, biological contributions to behavior sensation, perception, learning, motivation, personality, abnormal and social psychology, among others.

PSY 214 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (3)
An exploration of human psychological growth and development from conception through adolescence. Covers physical development, perceptual-cognitive and linguistic development, and social and moral development. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

PSY 230 TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS (3)
An introduction to the study of psychological measurement and valuation. Individual and group tests in the areas of intelligence, achievement, aptitudes and personality are introduced. Test administration, scoring and interpretation are included. Prerequisites: PSY 110.

PSY 240 INTERVIEWING: THEORETICAL AND SKILL BASED APPROACHES (3)
An introduction to the process of helping individuals through the use of interviewing and counseling techniques. A range of theoretical perspectives will be examined regarding this process. Addresses interpersonal communication and multicultural issues. Focuses on the development of skills using case studies, videos and role playing. this course is open to all majors and may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or SWK 120 or permission of instructor.

PSY 258 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
The psychological study of individuals in relation to groups and society. This course offers insight into the dynamic interaction between persons and their social environments and various social problems related to such interaction. Topics include group dynamics, attitude development and attitude change, aggression and violence, and helping behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or permission of instructor. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor. This course is also listed as SOC 258.

PSY 284 GENERAL STATISTICS (3)
Cross-listed as BUS 284/SOC 284.

PSY 310 PERSONALITY (3)
A survey of theory and research on the development and modification of personality characteristics. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: PSY 110 or permission of instructor, upper-division standing.

PSY 325 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Focuses on a significant theme or topic in psychology that supplements regularly offered electives. Possible topics could include aging, cognitive sciences and religion, psychology of women, psychology of gender, psychology of racism and child psychopathology. Courses in particular topics will be offered based on student demand. May be taken more than once with different topics. Prerequisites: PSY 110.

PSY 340 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
The study of facts, theories and attitudes concerning abnormal behavior. Various ways in which individuals deviate from the norm in their thinking, feeling and behaving are discussed from the perspectives of psychologists' major theories of personality. Possible causes of abnormal behavior and approaches to treatment and prevention are also presented. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

PSY 360 BASICS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH (3)
This course presents the nature of the scientific method and research applied to the analysis and interpretation of both quantitative and qualitative data. An introduction to the basic techniques of social research as well as data analysis and interpretation will be presented. Students will learn how to use SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) to analyze and interpret quantitative data. Writing-enhanced course; prerequisites: SWK 120 or PSY 110 or SOC 152. Cross-listed as SOC 360/SWK 360.

PSY 370 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING (3)
A study of the fundamental principles of conditioning and learning ranging from Pavlovian conditioning through cognitive processes including concept formation, verbal learning and memory. Prerequisites: PSY 110.

PSY 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
Provides the student with an opportunity for empirical investigation or extensive reading in an area of one's own choosing. By arrangement and permission.

PSY 403 RESEARCH SEMINAR (3)
Students will obtain approval from the Institutional Review Board for research projects developed in the Basics of Social Research class. Students will collect and analyze their own data and write a research report. Students will deliver a formal conference style oral presentation of the work. Prerequisite: PSY 360, good or excellent score on research proposal.

PSY 412 PSYCHOLOGY, FAITH AND ETHICS (3)
This course is a concluding seminar for psychology majors. Areas of convergence and divergence between psychological and spiritual approaches to the human condition are explored, and various models of integration are presented and discussed. This course also reviews the ethical principles identified by the American Psychological Association as important in working with humans, either in research or in areas of applied psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 403 and senior status.

REL 100 INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL WORLDVIEW (3)
An introduction to each of the four main ways that modern theologians have attempted to understand the Bible (biblical studies, ethics, theology and spirituality) through the exploration of the biblical foundations of each approach. Students consider the distinctiveness and the relationships between these different approaches to the biblical text in an Anabaptist context. The course emphasizes the ability to read and understand biblical texts in a discerning way and to explore the text's potential for shaping a contemporary worldview. The Sermon on the Mount provides a focal text for the course.

REL 110 PRINCIPLES OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (3)
Christian education in the context of the church congregation is the primary focus of this course. An overview of the history, theology, use of the Bible, learning models and settings of Christian education leads to a comprehensive case study by each student of one congregation's educational ministry. Designed for persons currently involved or those who may become involved in Christian education. Prerequisite: REL 100. Offered alternate years.

REL 115 WORLD RELIGIONS (3)
An introduction to the major religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism and Islam. The course attempts to understand these world wisdom traditions on their own terms through a consideration of their origins, history, sacred texts and religious practices. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

REL 230 CHRISTIAN WORSHIP (3)
An examination of how persons and groups have expressed Christian faith through worship. The course includes a historical survey of worship practices, a comparative study of current worship practices in various traditions and an examination of how the various arts are used in and contribute to worship. Offered on demand.

REL 231 MUSIC MINISTRY (2)
Cross-listed as MUS 231.

REL 242 SPIRITUAL DISCIPLINES (3)
The goal of this course is to expose students to biblical spirituality and historical models of spirituality. In addition to fulfilling the conventional requirements of a typical academic course, students are encouraged to cultivate spiritual devotion in their own personal and corporate lives. Class assignments require more than academic performance. They also challenge students to reflect deeply on and to develop disciplines that will enhance their spiritual lives. Prerequisite: REL 100. Offered alternate years.

REL 250 INTRODUCTION TO OLD TESTAMENT (3)
An introduction to the literature of the Old Testament with emphasis on the primary text. Students read and analyze material from a broad spectrum of biblical texts in the effort to understand the main components of the biblical story and the nature of the literature in the Old Testament. The course emphasizes the ability to read and understand biblical text in a discerning way and to explore the text's potential for continuing to shape a modern world view. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 252 INTRODUCTION TO NEW TESTAMENT (3)
An introduction to the literature of the New Testament with emphasis on the primary text. Students read and analyze material from a broad spectrum of biblical texts in the effort to understand the main components of the biblical story and the nature of the literature in the New Testament. The course emphasizes the ability to read and understand biblical text in a discerning way and to explore the text's potential for continuing to shape a modern world view. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 273 CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY (3)
The course surveys central doctrines of the Christian faith and develops a few doctrines in more depth. Topics include the nature and work of Christ, the nature of the church, eschatology, religious authority and creation. Emphasis on particular topics may vary. The overall focus of the course is to present these doctrines both from the perspective of the church of the so-called Constantinian synthesis and from peace church perspectives. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 274 CHRISTIAN ETHICS (3)
The first part of the course demonstrates how much of mainstream ethics reflects the church of the so-called Constantinian synthesis and then provides a peace church view of Christian ethics. The second part of the course applies this learning to the spectrum of issues that confront Christians in the modern world. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 275 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY (3)
A history of the Christian church from the death of Jesus Christ through the 16th century. Special attention is paid to the rise of bishops, the formation of creeds, the Great Schism, the Constantinian Shift, the monastic era, pre-reformation free church movements and the reformation in its Anglican, Radical, Protestant and Catholic forms. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 276 WAR, PEACE AND NONVIOLENCE (3)
This course surveys biblical teachings on war and peace and survey the variety of theological understandings throughout the history of the Christian church. The course treats both individual and international dimensions of peacemaking. Sophomore standing required. Prerequisite: REL 100. This course is one of the core courses in the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

REL 311 JESUS (3)
An investigation of one area in the study of Jesus. Course content varies and is announced prior to registration. Areas of investigation include a discussion of the methodological problems involved in studying the historical Jesus and may concentrate on a theme such as: 1) a study of one of the Synoptic Gospels; 2) a study of the history of research on the historical Jesus in the 19th and 20th centuries; 3) Jesus images in literature; or 4) how Christology is treated in such specific theologies as black theology, feminist theology and womanist theology. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 312 EXEGETICAL STUDIES (3)
An investigation of one particular book or selection of text in the Bible. Occasionally the focus is on ancient texts outside of the Bible that are of particular importance for understanding the origins and nature of Christian and/or Jewish faith. The focal areas include (but are not limited to) the Psalms, the prophets, women in the Old Testament, the Gospel of John, the letters of Paul, the book of Revelation and the Dead Sea Scrolls. The topics alternate and are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: the appropriate introduction course (REL 250 or REL 252) or permission from instructor. With an appropriate topic, this course may be taken as part of the Women's Studies minor.

REL 320 HISTORICAL AND THEOLOGICAL STUDIES (3)
An investigation of one area of church history or Christian theology. Topics vary across the entire range of Christian history and are announced prior to registration. While not limited to the following, topics might include the history of monasticism, the theology of Martin Luther, the theology of John Calvin, Radical Reformation, black theology, liberation theology, feminist theology, atonement theology. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120 and REL 273 or REL 274 and sophomore standing, or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years. With an appropriate topic, this course may be taken as part of the Women's Studies minor.

REL 322 METHODS OF BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION (3)
Examines various approaches to how Christians today read and interpret the Bible. Explores problems and possibilities associated with interpreting the Bible and looks at various principles and methods of interpretation that have been proposed. Examines how to read the Bible devotionally and how to lead Bible studies in a variety of settings, such as in youth groups, residence hall Bible studies and Sunday school classes. Prerequisite: REL 100. Offered alternate years.

REL 325 SACRED AND CIVIL RELIGION IN AMERICA (3)
The course surveys developments in American religion from the earliest permanent settlements by Europeans to the present. Particular attention is given to those aspects of the American religious scene which have contributed to the evolution of Civil Religion. Examples of these phenomena might be the New England Theocracies, the Revolutionary War, the Benevolent Empire, the Civil War or the separation of church and state. Prerequisites: REL 100, REL 273 or permission of instructor.

REL 332 CHRISTIAN MISSIONS (3)
This course studies how God works in the world to bring about reign of God and transform human lives and how churches participate in that mission. Students survey major eras in the history of Christian missions, learn to recognize contemporary "types" of mission strategy and develop the biblical and theological basis of Christian mission. They examine how to share a message that truly is good news for people suffering violence and oppression, for people who want to protect their cultural and religious traditions from Western culture and for people in the increasingly pluralistic "post-Christian" West itself. The course makes regular use of case studies. Prerequisites: REL 100, REL 220.

REL 334 FOUNDATIONS OF CHRISTIAN MINISTRY (3)
Addresses fundamental ministry issues on the personal and professional level, including one's call to ministry; the theological principles of ministry; the balance of priestly and prophetic roles in the ministry; and the character, integrity and ethics of the ministering person. The course examines identity issues, congregational systems theory and collegiality issues, both in terms of gender issues and working in multiple staff situations. Writing-enriched course. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120 and REL 100.

REL 336 DISCIPLING AND MENTORING (3)
Examines ways of encouraging and nurturing people in their faith development. Students analyze, critique and implement methods of discipleship and mentoring in both one-on-one and small group contexts. Course gives attention both to foundational/theoretical issues and practical issues. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 340 RELIGIOUS COMMUNICATION (3)
Cross-listed as COM 340.

REL 342 LEADERSHIP COMMUNICATION IN NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (3)
Cross-listed as COM 342.

REL 352 CONTEMPORARY STUDIES IN THEOLOGY AND ETHICS (3)
An investigation of one area of Christian theology or ethics. Topics vary and are announced prior to registration. While not limited to the following, topics might include particular focused studies (creation, atonement, intimacy and the body, digital culture), theological or ethical movements (black theology, feminist theology or ethics, environmental ethics) or studies of significant contemporary theologians (John Howard Yoder, Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza, Gustavo Gutierrez). May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisites: REL 273 or REL 274 and sophomore standing, or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

REL 359 MENNONITE HISTORY AND THOUGHT (3)
Cross-listed as HIS 359.

REL 362 YOUTH MINISTRY I: THEOLOGY AND PROGRAMMING (3)
This course explores the theological foundations of youth ministry and their implications for programming in the church. The specific approaches of various theological traditions to youth ministry are explored. Attention is given to the development of adolescent spirituality and how an awareness of these characteristics affects the nature of the age-specific youth ministry approach. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 364 YOUTH MINISTRY II: HISTORY AND PRAXIS (3)
This course takes a historical survey of the development of the concept of adolescence and subsequent progression of specific programs of youth ministry. The rise of the vocation of youth ministry is analyzed with its resulting praxis issues. The world of the adolescent is explored in its psychosocial and cultural realms. Prerequisite: REL 100.

REL 385 PRACTICUM (3)
Students carry out an assignment in a church or other institution under the supervision of a minister or other director. Students meet with supervisor and teacher on a regular basis. May include readings and writing assignments as appropriate. For upper-level students.

REL 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3-5)
By arrangement.

REL 395 RELIGION SEMINAR (1)
Seminar serves as capstone to the religion department majors and minors and enables students to integrate the learning from prior religion courses. Each participant in the seminar makes a presentation to the seminar which depicts her or his religious world view in conversation with these learnings. Seminar presentations emphasize integration, synthesis and analytical thinking. Prerequisite: upper-level standing.

SED 220 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND DIVERSITY (2)
This course is designed as a study of the characteristics, problems, promises and issues of adolescence and will focus on aspects of adolescent development and the possible special needs of adolescents that are particularly relevant to persons who will be professionally involved with both adolescents and their families. The course includes a survey of the physical, intellectual, social and emotional development of the typical adolescent and also provides a study of the unique needs and characteristics of adolescents who are at risk or who have disabilities. Students will have the opportunity to observe and interact with adolescents within middle and high school settings. Topics to be covered in this course: physical, intellectual, emotional and social development; becoming a change agent in the secondary classroom; collaboration and consultation; holistic programs; regular and special education programs in middle schools and high schools; diverse populations in middle/secondary schools; family-school partnerships; and sociocultural awareness. 15 field hours. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 205.

SED 228 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION OF STUDENTS WITH MILD AND MODERATE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (3)
This course is an introduction to the broad spectrum of abilities of students aged 3-21 with mild to moderate disabilities. A study of the history, definition, characteristics, assessment and services is covered as well as family, social and legal aspects. Numerous philosophical and practical perspectives are integrated into current practices of diagnosis and intervention as they relate to the specific needs of persons with disabilities in the community, school and world of work. Topics to be covered in this course: schools, society and achievement; special programs; labels and children with mild and moderate disabilities; cognitive and academic characteristics; social-emotional characteristics; individualizing instruction; services, curriculum and instruction; research-based and traditional approaches to teaching; inclusion and collaboration; early intervention and preschool intervention programs. 12 field hours. Prerequisites: EDU 200 and EDU 205.

SED 230 DIAGNOSIS AND EDUCATIONAL PLANNING FOR SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN (3)
This course focuses on information and practical experiences relating to assessment and remediation of children with mild/moderate educational needs. Topics to be covered include formal and informal criterion-referenced assessment, individualized educational plans, multidisciplinary approaches, parental roles, report writing, collaboration. 20 clinical hours. Prerequisites: SED 228, junior standing or consent of the instructor.

SED 235 LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS (3)
This course introduces speech and language acquisition of the typically and atypically developing child. It also presents a survey of various disorders and their effects on receptive (listening and reading) and expressive (oral and written) language functions and learning. Students become familiar with the diagnostic tools and the professional vocabulary in order to communicate effectively with other professionals. Emphasis is placed on methods that the regular classroom or intervention specialist can use to communicate with and teach children with diverse learning styles in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Students become sensitive to the concerns of speech and language differences related to culture and environmental issues. 10 field hours. Prerequisite: SED 228 and junior standing or consent of the instructor.

SED 344 INTERVENTION SPECIALIST CLASSROOM ORGANIZATION (2)
This course is designed to assist prospective intervention specialists in understanding teacher and student behaviors, discipline in the educational process and communication techniques as they apply to good classroom management. In addition, students will explore techniques for maximizing learning in a variety of classroom settings, building students' self-concepts and understanding the use and abuse of power. 45 field hours. Prerequisites: junior standing and all major requirements as listed in the professional preparation outline for early childhood. Course is taken during the semester of clinical practice.

SED 383 EARLY INTERVENTION PRACTICUM (3)
This course is designed to meet partial requirements for the Early Education of the Handicapped (EEH) endorsement. It includes course content focusing on the needs of pre-school children with moderate to intensive educational needs and also includes a 30 hour focused field experience in an early intervention classroom. Offered May term only. Prerequisite: SED 228.

SED 384 METHODS/MATERIALS FOR STUDENTS WITH M/M EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (3)
This course is designed to develop teacher competency, to analyze learners and to plan the "least restrictive environment" for the student with mild to moderate educational needs. Candidates will develop skills in designing, implementing and evaluating appropriate educational interventions in the areas of language, math, reading, behavior and social skills. Attention will also be given to occupational orientation and transition planning. Candidates will develop knowledge and skills in designing lessons, classroom environments, community-based instruction and transition planning. Prerequisite: 10 Field Hours, EDU 200, EDU 205, SED 228, PSY 110.

SED 389 CURRENT ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (1)
This course is designed to present current issues affecting the education of exceptional children. Students will examine such topics as contemporary research findings, community and governmental resources, current federal and state regulations, special education service delivery models and counseling/supporting parents of exceptional children. Prerequisite: EDU 200 and EDU 205.

SED 453 CLINICAL PRACTICE- IS (12)
Clinical practice provides supervised experiences in applying the principles and techniques learned in the professional courses to classroom situations under the guidance and direction of a cooperating teacher. Clinical Practitioners spend full days in their assigned public school setting for 12 weeks during the senior year. Credit/no credit.

SOC 152 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3)
What sociologists do and how they think; the study of the interaction of individuals and groups with their physical and social environment; consideration of basic concepts, theories and major principles of explanation used by sociologists.

SOC 162 ANTHROPOLOGY (3)
The comparative study of culture and the development of human beings with an emphasis on primitive societies, past and present.

SOC 185 WOMEN IN SOCIETY: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (3)
This course examines the roles, status and contributions of women in social institutions including the family, work place, health system, politics, religion and education. While the course focuses on American society, international perspectives are introduced. The course utilizes guest speakers with expertise in appropriate areas. Examples of topics include the contemporary women's movement (1960-present), the roles of women in changing family structures, the "feminization of poverty," the impact of changing laws regarding domestic violence, the status of women in organized religion and special concerns of women of color. This course is also listed as SWK 185.

SOC 208 SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY (3)
A study of modern marriage and family institutions in the context of radical social change; topics include the social regulation of mate selection, kinship relationships and sexual behavior, evaluation of research findings and emerging trends. This course may be taken as part of the Women's Studies minor.

SOC 225 RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (3)
A course studying the data, causes and social patterns of differences due to race and minority status as well as the means available to achieve a less-prejudiced social order. Interdisciplinary sources are used. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

SOC 258 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
The psychological study of individuals in relation to groups and society. This course offers insight into the dynamic interaction between persons and their social environment and various social problems related to such interaction. Topics include group dynamics, attitude development and attitude change, aggression and violence, and helping behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or permission of instructor. This course is also listed as PSY 258. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

SOC 264 Social Theory (3)
An examination of basic intellectual traditions and paradigm regarding society, including normative beliefs and values, as well as scientific theories of social relations and culture from the 18th century to the present. Emphasis on selected early and contemporary theorists. Prerequisite: SOC 152.

SOC 275 CRIMINOLOGY (3)
Cross-listed as CRJ 275.

SOC 284 GENERAL STATISTICS (3)
Cross-listed as BUS 284/PSY 284.

SOC 320 FAMILY VIOLENCE (3)
Violent family life has largely been hidden from public analysis. In this class we critically examine the emergence of intimate violence as a social problem, are exposed to experiences of persons involved with family violence, explore various explanations for violence in families and analyze various prevention and policy measures. In each of these cases, attention is paid to the impact (or non-impact) of demographic factors, such as ethnicity, race and religion, on the occurrence and effect of intimate violence. This course may be taken as part of the Women's Studies minor. This course is also listed as CRJ 320.

SOC 330 SOCIAL JUSTICE AND SOCIAL CHANGE (3)
This course begins with a history of social justice and social change as concepts in the field of sociology and then sees how this foundation influenced contemporary social justice practitioners and theorists. Particular attention is given to social movements, the role of organizing and civil society. Theory is integrated into practical social justice methodologies and community-based learning. Particular attention is paid to issues of power and powerlessness in domestic and/or international contexts. Prerequisite: SOC 152. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

SOC 340 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (3)
This course will focus upon significant themes or topics in sociology that will supplement our regularly offered courses. Possible topics could include environmental sociology, sociology of mass media, sociology of sexuality and gender and sociology of community development. Courses will be offered based upon student needs and demand. May be taken more than once with different topics. Prerequisite: SOC 152.

SOC 360 BASICS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH (3)
Cross-listed as PSY 360/SWK 360

SOC  365

 

SPA 111, SPA 121 BEGINNING SPANISH 1, 2 (3 each)
Emphasizes audio-bilingual skills, supplemented by language laboratory. Includes grammar and reading.

SPA 225 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH (3)
Rapid, intensive review of grammar; selected prose readings. Language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisite: SPA 121 or placement in course through exam.

SPA 240 SPANISH CONVERSATION: STORY OF THE SPANISH SPEAKING WORLD (3)
Advanced conversation with emphasis on the human geography of contemporary Spanish speaking societies. The class will focus on telling stories of life in the Spanish speaking world. Historical forays will be used to cast light on current realities. Prerequisite: SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 242 SPANISH CONVERSATION: MUSIC, FILM, AND POPULAR CULTURE IN THE SPANISH SPEAKING WORLD (3)
Advanced conversation with emphasis on Latino/Hispanic popular culture in Latin America, Spain and the Diaspora. Students will listen to and learn music, view and critique films and overhear conversations as windows into contemporary culture. Prerequisite: SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 244 SPANISH CONVERSATION: CONFLICT AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN THE SPANISH SPEAKING WORLD (3)
Advanced conversation with emphasis on the struggle for cultural, political and economic survival of communities with roots in the Spanish speaking world. Particular emphasis will be placed on areas of current conflict. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor. Prerequisite: SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 301 SPANISH PROSE COMPOSITION (3)
Advanced composition with emphasis on syntax and style. Achievement of a high level of oral and written fluency. Analysis and discussion of contemporary texts of Hispanic prose. May be repeated for credit whenever literature content and course objectives are different. Writing-enriched course; Prerequisites: ENG 110 or ENG 120 and SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 302 SPANISH PENINSULAR CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)
Lectures, readings and discussions on Spanish history, philosophy, religion, education, music, architecture, science. Prerequisite: SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 303 LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)
Lectures, readings and discussions on Latin American history, philosophy, religion, education, music, architecture, science and pre-Colombian cultures. Prerequisite: SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 306 ADVANCED GRAMMAR REVIEW (3)
Conversation, readings, and a review or, in many cases, relearning of specific areas of grammar. The texts will provide the students with a means to understand very difficult conceptual distinctions between English and Spanish and, when there is no graspable concept involved, to learn particular differences between the two. Prerequisite: SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 311 SURVEY OF PENINSULAR SPANISH LITERATURE (3)
A survey course designed to acquaint the student with the most important works of Peninsular Spanish literature. Analysis and discussion of major works from medieval period to the present. Prerequisite: SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 312 SURVEY OF SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
A survey course designed to acquaint the student with the most important works of Spanish American literature from the colonial period to the present. Prerequisite: SPA 225 or consent of instructor.

SPA 314 SPANISH TEACHING METHODS (3)
This course provides the prospective Spanish educator with methods and materials for teaching Spanish in elementary and secondary school settings. Methods, materials, and practices related to curriculum instruction are the focus of this course. Topics covered in this course: development, implementation, and evaluation of educational programming for the Spanish classroom. Additional topics include federal and state curriculum models and assessment models, classroom assessment strategies (formal and informal), use of technology, individualizing instruction, development of integrated units, collaboration and consultation. Course is taken before clinical practice semester.

SPA 385 SPANISH INTERNSHIP (1-3)
Allows the student to apply classroom learning to work in a Spanish-language setting, with an on-site supervisor and overall supervision and evaluation by Bluffton faculty (Spanish instructor and/or department chair).

SPA 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
By arrangement.

SWK 120 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK (3)
Introduces social work as a professional endeavor and the service programs and policies of formally organized agencies and institutions in which social workers work. Looks at the history, purpose, values, methods and structure of the profession. A variety of practice settings and social problem issues of concern are examined. Students are challenged to examine their own value commitment to working with people and striving for social reform, whether as a social work professional or public citizen. Includes a 15-clock-hour community service learning experience in a social service agency.

SWK 141 UNDERSTANDING SOCIAL WELFARE (3)
This course introduces students to the institutional systems developed in the United States and world wide to meet human needs. The course includes a historical survey of the development of social welfare and examination of society's response to major social issues such as poverty and discrimination. The relationship between societal values and social welfare policies is examined as well as current trends likely to affect the future of social welfare, such as the globalization of corporations and the growth of consumerism.

SWK 185 WOMEN IN SOCIETY: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (3)
This course examines the roles, status and contributions of women in social institutions including the family, work place, health system, politics, religion and education. While the course focuses on American society, international perspectives are introduced. The course utilizes guest speakers with expertise in appropriate areas. Examples of topics include the contemporary women's movement (1960-present), the roles of women in changing family structures, the "feminization of poverty," the impact of changing laws regarding domestic violence, the status of women in organized religion and special concerns of women of color. This course is also listed as SOC 185. This course is the core course in the Women's Studies minor.

SWK 240 INTERVIEWING: THEORETICAL AND SKILL BASED APPROACHES (3)
An introduction to the process of helping individuals through the use of interviewing and counseling techniques. A range of theoretical perspectives will be examined regarding this process. Addresses interpersonal communication and multicultural issues. Focuses on the development of skills using case studies, videos and role playing. this course is open to all majors and may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or SWK 120 or permission of instructor.

SWK 263 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT 1 (3)
This course focuses on the developmental tasks of the individual through the life cycle from infancy through old age. The influence of the family and other primary groups is examined. Variety and diversity of human experience is explored in context of cultural expectations, values and social change.

SWK 264 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT 2 (3)
This course focuses on the interactional effects of social institutions, diverse groups and individuals. The community as the milieu in which individuals, families and groups function is examined from an ecological perspective. The implications of this knowledge for social work practice are examined.

SWK 280 CHILD WELFARE SERVICES (3)
A survey of the child welfare field, examining the range of in-home, foster-care and institutional services, along with related policy issues. Looks at the various organizations and their structures and procedures concerned with child welfare issues, including the legal system. Issues of state regulation for protecting children will be studied as well as approaches to child advocacy. This course is to serve social work majors exploring their interests in the field and for non-majors whose careers will have them relating to the child welfare system.

SWK 301 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 1: MICRO (3)
This first course in the social work practice sequence presents a generalist model for the sequence. The emphasis is on developing skills in the use of communication techniques including interviewing, individual and family needs assessments, developing and implementing service plans, identification of formal and informal resources and beginning practice evaluation. Prerequisites: SWK 263 and SWK 264.

SWK 302 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 2: MEZZO (3)
Introduces theory of group dynamics including communication, group formation, member roles and group functions. Develops skill in the use of small group technique for personal, small group and environmental change.

SWK 303 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 3: MACRO (3)
Further development of social work methodology with populations-at-risk using techniques of community needs assessment, socio-political processes and coalition building and outcome evaluations. Focuses on building macro-practice skills through a supervised services program development or community development project. Prerequisite: SWK 302 or concurrent with SWK 301.

SWK 360 BASICS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH (3)
Cross-listed as PSY 360/SOC 360

SWK 372 SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY AND ANALYSIS (3)
The focus of this course is on evaluation and critical analysis of social welfare policies, programs and services. Students are introduced to a framework for analyzing social needs and social problems and methods of service delivery. Practical implications in social welfare policy for social workers are emphasized, incorporating the roles and skills that comprise the "practice of policy." Prerequisite: SWK 141.

SWK 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SOCIAL WORK (1-3)
For advanced students capable of self-motivated study in an area of the student's interest and not covered in the social work curriculum. Requires the agreement of a faculty member to monitor and consult on the study. Prerequisite: faculty consent.

SWK 401 FIELD WORK (12)
Educationally directed field experience in a social agency under the supervision of an agency supervisor and the direction of a faculty member for 448 clock hours. The student is expected to implement the theory and knowledge gained throughout the curriculum and demonstrate the practice competencies learned in the practice sequence. Prerequisites: SWK 301, SWK 302, SWK 303 and SWK 372. Corequisite: SWK 404.

SWK 404 FIELD WORK SEMINAR (1)
A weekly seminar concurrent with field work to facilitate integration of theory with practice. Corequisite: SWK 401.

SWK 405 SOCIAL WORK SEMINAR (3)
This course completes the social work practice sequence and the social work curriculum and marks a shift from programmed learning to self-directed learning. Students engage in research to acquaint themselves with a selected field of practice. Emphasis is on ethical issues and decision-making in practice, as well as some of the broad issues in social work and professional life. It provides an opportunity for students to integrate their learning and bridge the gap from classroom to job or graduate school. Prerequisite: senior status.

TEC 102 Using Microcomputers 2   (2)
Designed to provide familiarity with data processing using microcomputers in a hands-on environment. Coverage includes spreadsheet software and database software.

TEC 105 Web Applications   (3)
This course is an introduction to web page development using existing standards and web applications such as XHTML and CSS. Basic coding concepts, organization of files, page design, computer ethics and work with common web media types will be stressed.

TEC 150 Web Animation (3)
This course is an introduction to animation applications used in web page development using existing standards and web applications. Basic design and interface concepts will be stressed. Topics covered in course: animation concepts, design elements, elements of interface, intro level scripting. 

TEC 200 Scripting Languages   (3)
A study of the basic concepts of scripting languages, their history and development, and their uses as they relate to web-based applications and e-business. Students learn to build and use simple scripts to run within various applications with an emphasis on JavaScript within HTML and ActionScript within Flash. Prerequisites: TEC 105 or permission of instructor.

TEC 250 Web Animation 2-Scripting and Integration  (3)
This course is a continuation of TEC 150 with an emphasis on scripting applied within web-based animation applications such as Flash, using ActionScript. The course will also introduce other applications used in script-based web applications such as PHP. Topics covered in course: scripting concepts, object-oriented programming concepts, intermediate level scripting and interaction of multiple applications in web design.

TEC 369 Introduction to Information Systems   (3)
A survey of an organization's information needs and the tools and strategies required to satisfy and manage those needs. Prerequisites: MGT 354 and MKT 356 or TEC 250 or TEC 200.

TEC 385 Technology Practicum 1   (credit varies)
A supervised work/study technology placement in a campus or business setting consistent with the student's interest and career goals. Students enrolled in the practicum also meet one hour monthly to discuss their experiences with one another and with the instructor. Credit/no credit.

TEC 400 Technology, Ethics and Society   (2)
Students explore, both individually and in small groups, emerging technologies and the literature on technology as it relates to society. Instructors emphasize the social, ethical and political implications of current and emerging digital technology. Through readings, discussions and projects, students consider selected issues. Students also use technology for communication, research and discussion, both to reinforce technology skills and to stimulate a dialogue about the impact of technology on human interaction and culture. Writing-enhanced course; prerequisites: TEC 105, junior standing or permission of instructor.  Offered every third year.

TEC 485 Technology Practicum 2   (credit varies)
A supervised work/study technology placement in an off-campus setting consistent with the student's interest and career goals. Students enrolled in the practicum also meet one hour monthly to discuss their experiences with one another and with the instructor. Credit/no credit.

THE 135 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (3)
This introductory course aims to increase students' understanding, appreciation, and critical perceptions of theatrical performance through script analysis, performance evaluations, and engagement with a creative process. *This course qualifies as a Fine Arts course in the General Education program.

THE 136 THEATRE FOR SOCIAL CHANGE (3)
This course examines theoretical, practical, ethical, and aesthetic elements of theatre created to promote social justice. Students will research and practice performance methodologies that promote civic dialogue. The course includes the collaborative creation of an original piece of theatre by the class. *This course qualifies as a Fine Arts course in the General Education program. This course may be taken as part of the Peace and Conflict Studies minor.

THE 201 PLAY PRODUCTION (3)
Aids the student in preparing a play for performance. The course deals with script selection and analysis, character analysis, set, lighting, costume and makeup design. The student will select a one-act play on which to apply the various principles necessary for production preparation. Laboratory experience required through technical work on the current campus theatre production.

THE 224 DRAMA IN EDUCATION (3)
Students learn to incorporate drama skills and activities into programming and curriculum for children and youth. Process-oriented drama is used to explore subject matter, strengthen drama skills, strengthen conflict resolution skills and enhance critical thinking. After participating in professor-led dramas, students will design their own drama labs and lead them with the class as well as with a group of elementary school children.

THE 250 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEATRE (3)
Study of a special topic in theatre production, theory, history or dramatic literature.

THE 257 ORAL INTERPRETATION (3)
Offers practice in the art of reading aloud. The course is designed to develop understanding of literature and the ability to share this insight with listeners. It also gives students an opportunity to plan an oral reading. *This course qualifies as a Fine Arts course in the General Education program.

THE 258 ACTING (3)
Introduces the theory and technique of acting. Students participate in the use of the voice and body in short scenes from plays.

THE 302 PLAY DIRECTION (3)
Guides the student through the creative process of preparing a one-act play for performance. Course includes casting, rehearsing and performance, followed by a written evaluation of that experience including audience response. Student directors create a prompt book and direct scripts of choice approved by instructor. One-act plays are performed for college audience during "Night of One-Acts."

THE 326 HISTORY OF THEATRE (3)
Surveys stagecraft and acting from the Greek theatre to the present. This includes a study of one or more plays from each major era.

THE 390 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
By arrangement.





 

 

ABBREVIATIONS
The following abbreviations are used for the various academic areas:
Accounting (ACT)
Art (ART)
Biology (BIO)
Business (BUS)
Chemistry (CEM)
Communication (COM)
Computer science (CPS)
Criminal justice (CRJ)
Economics (ECN)
Education (EDU)
English (ENG)
Finance (FIN)
Geography (GEO)
Health, fitness & sport science (HFS)
History (HIS)
Honors (HON)
Human resource management (HRM)
Humanities (HUM)
Liberal arts and sciences (LAS)
Management (MGT)
Marketing (MKT)
Mathematics (MAT)
Music (MUS)
Natural science (NSC)
Nutrition and dietetics (NTR)
Organizational management (OMP)
Peace and conflict studies (PCS)
Philosophy (PHI)
Physics (PHY)
Political science (PLS)
Psychology (PSY)
Public Health (PHL)
Religion (REL)
Spanish (SPA)
Special education (SED)
Social work (SWK)
Sociology (SOC)
Technology (TEC)
Theatre (THE)

Add back Greek, Hebrew
COURSE NUMBERS
Courses are numbered to correspond with the recommended sequence in which they should be taken. Normally numbers also correspond with the college level at which they are taken. Courses numbered 300 or higher are upper-level courses primarily for juniors and seniors, though open to other qualified students; courses numbered lower than 300 are primarily for first-year students and sophomores. Courses numbered above 500 are graduate level courses. Students are advised to note prerequisites listed in course descriptions and to confer with their academic advisors or the registrar concerning sequence and level of specific courses.
COURSE CREDIT
Bluffton University operates on a semester calendar. All course credit is given in semester hours. The number of semester hours for each course is indicated in parentheses.

May 2014