Health, fitness & sport science

The health, fitness & sports science department is housed in the Sommer Center and Burcky Addition. The two areas provide the department with four full-court areas for practice and performance in volleyball and basketball in addition to office space for department faculty. In addition to courses designed for its majors, the department also offers a wide variety of skill courses, a strong intramural program in men's, women's and co-ed sports, and intercollegiate athletics to help students develop a better understanding and appreciation for movement and to foster a desire for life-long physical activity.
More info...

Majors

There are five majors - exercise science, sport and recreation leadership, strength and conditioningsport management and sports information; and four minors - coaching, wellness, and exercise science and recreation management offered by the health, fitness and sport science department.

Exercise Science major

 (46 hours)
Course work is planned in consultation with a departmental advisor and focuses on the student's area of interest.

HFS 110 Introduction to Exercise Science (3)
HFS 120 Team and Individual Sports 1 (3)
HFS 130 Team and Individual Sports 2 (3)
HFS 150 Human Sexuality (2)
HFS 160 Drug Education (2)
HFS 255 Competitive Strength Training (2)
    or HFS 265 Personal Strength Training (2)
HFS 117 Introduction to Sport Medicine (3)
HFS 220 Personal & Community Health Concerns (3)
HFS 240 Coaching Methods (3)
HFS 315 Therapeutic Recreation (3)
NTR 225 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
PHL 110 Introduction to Public Health (3)
NTR 240 Physical & Nutrition Assessment (2)
BIO 230 Anatomy & Physiology I (4)
HFS 310 Kinesiology (3)
HFS 320 Exercise Physiology (3)

Wellness concentration:

(22 hours)
Persons interested in the wellness concentration can major in exercise science or food and nutrition. In addition to course work, the student will have the opportunity to gain valuable professional training through an internship experience.

COM 195 Interpersonal Communication (3)
     or COM 185 Public Speaking and Persuasion (3)
HFS 225 Commercial Recreation (3)
HFS 260 Recreation & the Aging Process* (3)
NTR 325 Lifecycle Nutrition (3)
NTR 335 Public Health Nutrition and Policy (3)
NTR 400 Seminar in Wellness (1)
PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology (3)
HFS 305 Planning for Special Events (3) 

Sport Management major 

(47 hours)
The expansion of public interest and participation in sport and physical fitness has created a need for qualified leadership in these areas. Graduates will be prepared for careers as athletic administrators, in YMCA/YWCA work, in sporting goods companies, as sports information personnel and in other related areas.

Practical experience in an area of interest is provided to the student so insight into his/her chosen career may occur prior to graduation. The sites for these experiences are selected in cooperation with the student's advisor.

Students majoring in sport management are required to take 33 hours in core courses and a minimum of 3 hours of internship. Nine hours of classes are taken from either a sport communication concentration or from a sport organization concentration.

Required: (47 hours)
ACT 151 Principles of Accounting (3)
MGT 354 Principles of Management (3)
COM 175 Sport Communication (3)
ECN 141 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECN 142 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
HFS 112 Introduction to Sport Management (3)
HFS 230 Sport Psychology (3)
HFS 255 Competitive Strength Training (2)
     or HFS 265 Personal Strength Training (2)
HFS 270 Sport Ethics (3)
HFS 350 Sport and Administration Mgt Practices I * (3)
HFS 375 Sport and Administration Mgt Practices II * (3)
HFS 385 Internship (3)
MKT 356 Principles of Marketing (3) 

 

Sport communication concentration:

 

Sport organization concentration:

(9 hours)
HFS 360 Coaching Issues (3)
HFS 240 Coaching Methods (3)
MGT 359 Entrepreneurship (3)
MKT 360 Sales * (3)
MKT 362 Advertising  *(3)
MGT 364 Human Resource Management (3)
 

Sport & Recreation Leadership major 

(48 hours)
HFS 115 Introduction to Recreation (3)
HFS 120 Team and Individual Sports 1 (3)
HFS 130 Team and Individual Sports 2 (3)
HFS 135 Recreation Games and Social Recreation (3)
HFS 205 Recreation Leadership and Program (3)
HFS 215 Outdoor Recreation (3)
HFS 225 Commercial Recreation (3)
HFS 230 Sport Psychology (3)
HFS 235 Facilities Planning and Construction (3)
HFS 270 Sport Ethics (3)
HFS 117 Introduction to Sport Medicine (3)
HFS 305 Planning for Special Events (3)
HFS 240 Coaching Methods (3)
HFS 245 Camping Administration
   or HFS 350 Sport and Admin Mgt Practices I (3)
HFS 385 Internship (3)             

Electives:
HFS 155 Adventures in Outdoor Recreation (1-2)

 

Strength & Conditioning major  

(47 semester hours)
HFS 110 Introduction to Exercise Science (3)
HFS 160 Drug Education (2)
NTR 225 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)
NTR 325 Lifecycle Nutrition (3)
HFS 255 Competitive Strength Training (2)
HFS 265 Personal Strength Training (2)
HFS 355 Strength & Conditioning I (3)
HFS 117 Introduction to Sport Medicine (3)
PHL 110 Introduction to Public Health (3)
HFS 220 Personal & Community Health Concerns (3)
HFS 225 Commercial Recreation  (3)
HFS 230 Sport Psychology (3)
HFS 240 Coaching Methods (3)
HFS 310 Kinesiology (3)
HFS 320 Exercise Physiology  (3)
NTR 240 Physical & Nutrition Assessment (2)
HFS 385 Internship (3)


Sports Information Major

(45 semester hours)
HFS 112 Introduction to Sport Management (3)

COM 105 Introduction to Journalism (3)
ECN 141 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
COM 175/HFS 175 Sport Communication (3)
HFS 230 Sport Psychology (3)
HFS 270 Sport Ethics (3)
COM 334 Radio Production (3)
COM 345 Video Production (3)
HFS 350 Sport and Adm Mgt Practices I (3)
HFS 375 Sport and Adm Mgt Practices II (3)
MKT 356 Principles of Marketing (3)
HFS 385 Internship (3)
COM 412 New Media (3)

Choose one of the following:
MKT 362 Advertising (3)
ENG 207 Professional and Technical Writing (3)
COM 277 Public Relations (3)

Activity Credits (3 semester hours)
HFS 118 Video Activity (.5)
HFS 119 Sport Information Activity (.5)
COM 111 Student Newspaper Activity (.5)
COM 112 Radio Activity (.5)

Minors

Bluffton University offers minors in coachingexercise science, recreation management and wellness.

Coaching minor 

(19 hours)
Persons other than exercise science majors may be interested in a minor in coaching. The minor requires a coaching internship.

HFS 120 Team and Individual Sports 1 (3)
     or HFS 130 Team and Individual Sports 2 (3) 
HFS 117 Introduction to Sport Medicine (3)
HFS 240 Coaching Methods (3)
HFS 255 Competitive Strength Training & Exercise (2)
     or HFS 265 Personal Strength Training & Exercise (2)
HFS 270 Sport Ethics (3)
HFS 360 Issues in Coaching (3)
HFS 385 Internship (2)

Exercise Science minor

(20 hours)
BIO 230 Anatomy & Physiology I (4)
HFS 110 Introduction to Exercise Science  (3)   
HFS 120 Team and Individual Sports 1(3)
    or HFS 130 Team and Individual Sports 2 (3)
HFS 255 Competitive Strength Training (2)
HFS 265 Personal Strength Training (2)
HFS 315 Therapeutic Recreation* (3)
HFS 320 Exercise Physiology* (3) 

 

Recreation Management minor

(18 hours)
The recreation management minor enables students to develop recreation skills and interests through a variety of avenues and to better understand the importance of leisure in our society. The minor includes the following recreation courses:


HFS 115 Introduction to Recreation (3)
HFS 135 Games and Social Recreation (3)
HFS 145 Recreation Arts and Crafts (3)
HFS 205 Recreation Leadership and Program (3)
HFS 215 Outdoor Recreation (3)
HFS 315 Therapeutic Recreation Service (3)
or HFS 235 Camping Administration (3)

Wellness minor

(21 hours)
Persons in areas other than the food and nutrition and exercise science majors (which have a wellness concentration for the major), may be interested in a minor in wellness. The minor consists of 21 hours of course work including the following:

BIO 230 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
COM 195 Interpersonal Communication (3)
      or COM 185 Public Speaking and Persuasion (3)
HFS 117 Introduction to Sport Medicine (1)
HFS 255 Competitive Strength Training and Exercise (2)
HFS 220 Personal and Community Health Concerns (3)
NTR 225 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3)

A minimum of five additional hours are to be chosen from courses within the wellness concentration. A person minoring in wellness must graduate with current first aid and CPR certification.

 

Courses

HFS 110  Introduction to Exercise Science (3)
Provides an introduction to exercise science and the theory of movement and play. Assists the professional in acquiring the skills necessary to appreciate the values of movement. Includes a study of the qualifications and professional preparation of the exercise science major. Covers aims and background of modern programs. The psychological implications of movement education are included. First-year student or sophomore standing.

HFS 112 Introduction to Sport Management (3)
This is a foundational course designed to introduce the student to the sport management profession. It will provide an overview of the sport industry including but not limited to organizational structures, event and facility management, sport communication, and interscholastic, intercollegiate and professional athletics

HFS 115 Introduction to Recreation and Sport Leadership (3)
Covers foundations of organized recreation, backgrounds and theories, objectives and principles, social and economic factors, public, private and commercial interests, and recreation and social institutions.
 

HFS 117 Introduction to Sport Medicine (3)
This course will focus on two categories. One category will be a head to toe evaluation emphasizing initial care and prevention of athletic injuries. Risk factors and mechanisms of athletic injuries are identified. Lab experiences are provided in taping, wrapping and usage of various modalities. The second category will be on CPR and First Aid. Students will earn their American Red Cross Certification by the end of the class.

Activity credit (.5 each)
A maximum of three (3) hours of graduation credit for non-majors and up to four (4) hours for majors; a maximum of three hours may be taken in any given area. Student must be enrolled in the activity during the semester for which the credit is received. Sport Information majors must complete a minimum of three activity credits toward graduation requirements. Supervising faculty determine the requirements needed to receive the activity credit based on individual student need and prior participation of the student. Grading will be credit/no credit.

  HFS 118 Video Activity (.5)
Participation in a minimum of 12 events with on-line video streaming for home athletic events.

  HFS 119 Sport Information Activity (.5)
Participation in a minimum of 12 athletic events with our Sport Information Director at home athletic events.

HFS 120 Team and Individual Sports 1 (3)
HFS 130 Team and Individual Sports 2
(3)
These courses emphasize personal mastery of the psychomotor skills and cognitive material of selected sport activities as well as the ability to analyze skill techniques. Instruction concentrates on the point of view of the participant as a prospective player.

HFS 135 Games and Social Recreation (3)
Focuses on individual, dual, low-organization activities, quiet games, table games and social mixers usable in programming in a recreation setting.

HFS 145 Recreation Arts and Crafts (3)
Involves designing for and working with various craft media including paper, metal, metal enamel, clay and other ceramic materials, plastic and weaving materials for children through adulthood in various recreational settings.
 
HFS 150 Human Sexuality (2)
This course is designed to examine the role and meaning of human sexuality as it relates to oneself and others. This course also considers society's sexual value systems including the Anabaptist/Mennonite perspective and reviews biological, psychological and sociological aspects of sexuality.
 
HFS 155 Adventures in Outdoor Recreation (1-2)
Designed to develop introductory skills in a variety of outdoor recreation adventure opportunities in areas such as: whitewater rafting, skiing, kayaking, backpacking and mountaineering.
 
HFS 160 Drug Education (2)
The course focuses on the problem of drugs in our society. Pharmacological, physiological, psychological and sociological aspects of drugs are studied. The course emphasizes that we are all drug educators regardless of the profession we choose. Each student is asked to suggest an active "plan" that can alter drug dependence using cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains of learning as a method of behavior modification.


HFS 175 Sport Communication (3)
Examines the relationships between sports and media within our cultural context. Through theoretical perspectives involving social criticism, social presence theory, standpoint theory, uses and gratifications theory and rhetorical analysis, participants consider media roles in sport narratives and associated cultural values.

HFS 205 Recreation Leadership and Program (3)
Studies principles of leadership and their application in the development of recreation programs. Topics such as goal setting, strength identification, value clarification and leadership throughout the lifespan will be explored.

HFS 215 Outdoor Recreation (3)
Study of basic techniques and resource availability for camping, hiking, backpacking, mountaineering and related activities. Review of the interest in outdoor recreation and its impact upon facilities and environment.

HFS 220 Personal and Community Health Concerns
(3)
Examines individual health habits and the normal developmental pattern for humans from conception through old age. The course emphasizes discussions and decisions about sexuality, marriage, selection of mate and proper nutrition and fitness. Communicable and chronic disease recognition and prevention and community/national health responsibility are explored.

HFS 225 Commercial Recreation
(3)
This course deals with the private sector of recreation opportunities, including industrial corporations, establishment of private corporations, profit camps, sports clubs and the use of public land by private endeavors. Offered alternate years.

HFS 230 Sport Psychology
(3)
Sport psychology is the psychological study of individuals in relation to sports and sport environments. Psychological principles are used to provide a foundation for understanding athletes, coaches, teams, fans, opponents and the mental aspects of sports. The focus is on performance enhancement through the use of mental skills training.

HFS 235 Facilities Planning and Construction
(3)
An in-depth exploration into planning, constructing, equipping and managing a variety of recreation facilities. Funding and fundraising is also explored. Offered alternate years.

HFS 240 Coaching Methods
(3)
This course examines the profession of coaching and involves studying the functions, techniques and methods of coaching boys' and girls' interscholastic/intercollegiate athletic teams. Organization and administration of athletic (and exercise science) programs are studied with sociological implications considered.

HFS 245  Camping Administration
(3)
This course deals with the development and implementation of successful camping programs and the total camp operation.

 
HFS 255 Competitive Strength Training and Exercise (2)
This course will provide both classroom and practical experience in the analysis of personal fitness and nutritional habits. The student will learn to correlate exercise science related coursework and practical skills of strength training and exercise.

HFS 265 Personal Training and Exercise (2)
Students will learn the basic fitness assessment and exercise prescription concepts. Exercise testing and prescription are presented within a health-related context, with practical applications for sports nutrition, weight management, the aging process and prevention and management of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, osteoporosis and arthritis.

HFS 270 Sport Ethics (3)
Students will explore the ethical presuppositions of competitive athletics and their connection both to ethical theory and to concrete moral dilemmas that arise in actual athletic competition. Students will examine the ethics of genetically enhancing athletic abilities, the morality of cheating, the ethics of strategic fouling and the impact of performance-enhancing drugs on the legitimacy of records. Students will be challenged to consider the morality of competition in sports, the ethical aspects of violence in sports and the arguments in defense of intercollegiate sports.

HFS 305 Planning for Special Events (3)
This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on creating, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing and implementing campus and community events. Offered alternate years.

HFS 310  Kinesiology
(3)
The science of human movement encompasses the anatomical and mechanical aspects of movement as they relate to sport, games and dance. Prerequisite: BIO 230, junior or senior standing. Offered alternate years.
 
HFS 315  Therapeutic Recreation Service (3)
Involves a study of leadership skills, techniques and adaptation of recreation activities for persons with disabilities. Offered alternate years.

HFS 320  Exercise Physiology
(3)
This course focuses on the immediate and long-term effects of exercise on the human body including theories and principles for improving performance. Prerequisite: BIO 230; physics, chemistry preferred. Offered alternate years.

HFS 325  Recreation and the Aging Process
(3) (inactive)
The role of recreation as it relates to understanding and working with older persons. Emphasizes the role of the recreation manager in pre-retirement planning and in social programs planning for the older adult in retirement. Offered alternate years.

HFS 335  Trends, Issues and Legislation in Recreation (3) (inactive)
A course designed to explore current issues, trends and legislation affecting the recreation management professional. Offered alternate years.
 
HFS 350  Sport and Administration Management Practices (3)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the many opportunities that exist for the professional administrator in sport management. A discussion of the foundation of sport management, career and employment opportunities, and essential skills needed in management aids the student in the development of his/her own personal philosophy of sport management in the 21st century. Offered alternate years.

HFS 355 Strength and Conditioning (3)

This course is designed for students preparing for the National Strength and Conditioning Association's (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification or for students wishing to gain additional practical application of exercise science, strength training and programming. This course will introduce key principles of resistance training and conditioning to maximize strength, speed, cardiovascular and flexibility training based on concepts learned in physiology, anatomy, kinesiology and psychology. Pre-requisites: BIO 230 and HFS 310 or HFS 320  

HFS 360 Issues in Coaching (3)
This course examines the various issues both past and present that today's coach, both at the interscholastic and intercollegiate level, will have to deal with. The importance of program organization and philosophy formation will be studied as it relates to dealing with issues.

HFS 375 Sport and Administration Management Practices II (3)
This course will provide students with extensive discussions of the foundational aspects of the profession and current topics from the field. Throughout the course, students will discuss the significance of sport as an international social institution. Students will learn the relevance of sociological, cultural, historical, political and psychological concepts to the management of sport. Students will learn the necessary professional skills and attitudes of sport managers and ways in which the globalization of sport continues to affect sport management professions.

HFS 385 Internship (1-15)
On-site experiences with an agency that delivers leisure services. This may include public recreation park agencies, voluntary or social agencies, correctional institutions, industries, therapeutic agencies, serving persons with disabilities or commercial recreation opportunities. Approval of department chair and instructor for non-recreation majors.

HFS 390 Independent Study
(1-4)
Individual readings, research and/or field study of a recreation issue, problem, service system or activity pattern. Can include individual growth of the student in a particular area. Approval of department chair and instructor for non-recreation majors.

June 2013