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  • history major
  • history minor
  • political science minor
  • international studies minor
  • adolescent/young adult licensure in social studies
  • geography course
  • history courses
  • political science courses
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    history and political science courses

    The development of a historical frame of reference, an appreciation of the dynamics of change and an understanding of the modern world constitute the broad objectives of the offerings in history and political science. The department's aim is the development of specific competencies: the ability to pursue historical research with skill and integrity, the facility to analyze with insight and balance and the demonstrated capacity to write with clarity and readability.

    Even though there is not a separate major in political science or international studies, history majors may choose to minor in those areas - provided that no courses taken to fulfill the requirements for one area are used to meet those in another area (An exception to this rule is that either HIS 245: Regional and National Studies or HIS 205: World Civilizations may count once for both the major and the International Studies minor).  The same rule holds true with regard to students wishing to have a minor in more than one area: no course may overlap among the different minors (while this rule may prevent students from doing certain combinations of minors using our existing course offerings, it does not exclude the possibility that other courses transferred in from other institutions might not make these combinations possible.)

    Students interested in using the History major in preparation for law school should also complete the pre-law core program. All majors are required to take at least one course in a non-Western area. Students considering graduate work in history are encouraged to consider a departmental honors project. Incoming first-year students might also want to consider the honors program.

    Students may repeat the “studies” courses (HIS 245, HIS 301, HIS 302, PLS 303) and HIS 350 if the content is different. In addition to the following history and political science courses, one course in history of religion, one in art history and one in music history may be counted toward a History major. In addition to the course requirements, all seniors will take a comprehensive examination covering all the subjects they have studied in history and political science.

    The department welcomes nonmajors in all of its courses.

    Major (40 hours)
    Required:
    HIS 200 Foundations of American Civilization (3)
    HIS 201 Modern America (3)
    HIS 225 History: Theory and Application (3)
    HIS 263 European History (3)
    HIS 205 World Civilizations (3) or HIS 245 Regional and National Studies (3)
    HIS 350 Research Seminar (4)
    HUM 221 Humanities 1 (3)
    HUM 222 Humanities 2 (3)
    HIS 265 European Social/Intellectual History (3) or HIS 302 Studies in European History (3)
    Any one of the following:
    HIS 253 American Social/Intellectual History (3)
    HIS 301 Studies in American History (3)
    HIS 305 African American History (3)
    HIS 310 U.S. Women’s History (3)

    Electives: (any three of the following)
    HIS 390 Independent Study in History (3)
    Any history course not taken in the above list*
    Any political science course*
    Any one course in history of religion
    Any one course in art history
    Any one course in music history
    *May take three history or political science courses as electives.

    Minors
    There are three possible minors in history and political science in the separate areas of history, political science and international studies. History majors may have a minor in political science and/or international studies, provided the guidelines outlined above are adhered to. Minors include the courses listed below:

    History (18 hours)
    Core: 15 hours
    HIS 225 History: Theory and Application (3)
    HIS 245 Regional and National Studies (3) or HIS 205 World Civilizations (3)
    HIS 200 Foundations of American Civilization (3)
    HIS 201 Modern America (3)
    HIS 263 European Survey (3)

    Choose one of the following:
    HIS 253 American Social/Intellectual History (3)
    HIS 265 European Social/Intellectual History (3)
    HIS 301 Studies in American History (3)
    HIS 302 Studies in European History (3)
    HIS 305 African-American History (3)
    HIS 310 U.S. Women’s History (3)

    Political Science (18 hours)
    PLS 215 Introduction to Politics (3)
    PLS 251 American Political Process (3)
    PLS 270 Political Theory (3)
    PLS 272 Global Politics (3)
    PLS 285 Comparative Politics (3)
    PLS 301 Constitutional Law (3) or PLS 303 Studies in Political Science (3)

    International Studies  (18 hours)
    Core: 12 hours
    HIS 245 Regional and National Studies (3)
    HIS 245 Regional and National Studies (second topic) (3)
    PLS 272 Global Politics (3)
    PLS 285 Comparative Politics (3)

    Electives: 6 hours
    PSY 262 Cross-cultural Psychology (3)
    EBA 371 International Trade and Investment (3)
    EBA 382 Economic Development and the Environment (3)
    GEO 111 Principles of Geography (3)
    Selected cross-cultural semester study abroad programs

    Adolescent/young adult licensure in social studies (99-100 hours including 16 LAS hours)
    Students who wish to obtain an Ohio teaching license for adolescent/young adult (7-12) in social studies must complete the following courses, in addition to general education and major requirements:
    Required:
    HIS 200 Foundations of American Civilization (3)
    HIS 201 Modern America (3)
    HIS 205 World Civilizations (3)
    HIS 225 History: Theory and Application (3)
    HIS 263 European Survey (3)
    EBA 141 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
    EBA 142 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
    PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology (3)
    SOC 152 Introduction to Sociology (3)
    PLS 215 Introduction to Politics (3)
    PLS 251 American Political Process (3)
    PLS 272 Global Politics
    PLS 285 Comparative Politics (3)
    GEO 111 Principles of Geography (3)

    Choose one:
    SOC 162 Anthropology (3)
    SOC 362 Methods of Social Research (3)

    Choose one:
    PSY 258 Social Psychology (3)
    PSY 262 Cross-cultural Psychology (3)

    Choose one:
    LAS 210 Reason and Argument (2)
    PHI 105 Introduction to Philosophy (3)

    Required professional education courses:
    EDU 200 Introduction to Teaching in a Diverse Society (3)
    EDU 205 Field Experience (1)
    SED 220 The Adolescent: Development and Diversity (2)
    PSY 254 Educational Psychology and Classroom Assessment (3)
    EDU 103 Computers and Technology in Education (2)
    EDU 332 Social and Philosophical Issues in Education (3)
    EDU 305 Content Area Literacy/General Methods (3)
    EDU 344 Adolescent/Young Adult Classroom Organization (2)
    EDU 403 Adolescent/Young Adult Special Methods: Social Studies (2)

    All of the previously listed professional education courses, plus the completion of at least 80 percent of the licensure area course work, are prerequisites for student teaching:
    EDU 451 Clinical Practice (Adolescent/Young Adult) (10)

    Courses
    GEO 111 Principles of Geography (3)
    Study of people, nations and theatres of current events in their physical environment in order that the student may more accurately analyze social and political problems. Recommended for state teaching certification in social studies but does not count for the History major.

    History
    HIS 200 Foundations of American Civilization (3)
    A chronological overview of American history from exploration and colonization through the Civil War. Emphasis will be placed on the growth and development of American society.

    HIS 201 Modern America (3)
    A chronological survey of American history from Reconstruction through the 1980s. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of industrialization, growth of the United States as a world power and the development of state capitalism.

    HIS 205 World Civilizations (3)
    A historical survey of the major non-European civilizations of the world: the ancient Near East, ancient China, India, Aztec and Mayan civilizations, as well as more recent ones. Some attention will be given to their interaction with Europe, but this will not be the primary focus.

    HIS 225 History: Theory and Application (3)
    A course for majors and interested nonmajors, this course combines a focus on historical methodology with its application in local archival sources. A variety of themes and topics will be considered, including great controversies, philosophies of history and the relationship of the historian to society. Having surveyed some key historiographical concepts, students will then turn to the practice of social history, applying the emphasis and research methods of social historians to sources in local history.

    HIS 245 Regional and National Studies (3)
    A specialized course of study on a particular topic or civilization significant in world history. Course topics may include Russia, Latin America, Canada, the Middle East, Africa, China and the Far East, etc. Announcement of the course topic will be made prior to registration.  May be taken more than once with different topics.

    HIS 252 Ohio and the Old Northwest (3)
    A selective study of important themes in Ohio and regional history beginning with the Mound-builders and extending through the period of colonization, Indian removal, the Civil War and the 20th century. Opportunities for individual exploration into local history will be provided and field trips will supplement lectures, readings and discussion. Offered alternate years.

    HIS 253 American Social and Intellectual History (3)
    A study of some selected major social and intellectual movements in American history from early settlements until recent years. Topics could include Puritanism, the First and Second Great Awakenings, reform movements, Social Darwinism, racism, imperialism, secularization, fundamentalism/evangelicalism, the Social Gospel movement, emerging urban problems or changing gender roles. Particular attention will be paid to developing intellectual currents and the socio-historical background that informed them. Offered every third year.

    HIS 263 European Survey (3)
    A chronological survey of the major structural features of European civilizations from Ancient Greeks through the Renaissance to the present. In order to supplement the cultural and literary survey from the humanities sequence, this course will give particular attention to the social and political development of European society. Both topical and chronological in approach, the intent is to enable the student to acquire a frame of reference for the significant and controversial features of Europe's development.

    HIS 265 European Social and Intellectual History (3)
    A study of the social and intellectual movements in European civilization in the modern period. Topics such as social life, religious activity, literary themes, the impact of science, the interaction of historical events and intellectual development and the advent of technological civilization will be considered. Recommended background in European history. Offered every third year.

    HIS 271/PCS 271 History of Northern Ireland and Background to the Troubles (3)
    This course covers Modern Irish History from 1800-1923. Class topics include Daniel O’Connell and his campaigns for Catholic Emancipation for Repeal of the Union; social, economic and demographic problems in pre-famine Ireland and the Great Famine and its impact on Irish society; emigration from Ireland in the course of the 19th century; the campaign for Home Rule under Butt, Parnell, Redmond and Dillon; and the land problem and its resolution and the end of landlordism; the Easter Rebellion and its political consequences. It focuses also upon the political issues and events out of which the Troubles arose in the l960s and early l970s.

    HIS 301 Studies in American History (3)
    A specialized course of study focusing upon a significant theme or topic in American history, such as African-American history. Recommended background in American history. May be taken more than once with different topics.

    HIS 302 Studies in European History (3)
    A specialized course of study focusing upon a significant theme or topic in European history. Recommended background in European history. May be taken more than once with different topics.

    HIS 305 African American History (3)
    A chronological survey of African American history from early colonial period through the civil rights struggles of the 1960s and 1970s. It begins by exploring the arrival of slavery and examining the problem that slavery posited in colonial life. The course moves on to examine the development of slavery in its classic form in antebellum America, with particular focus on different historo-graphical approaches, before moving on to survey African American life in the Jim-Crow south and the creation of segregation. Finally, the course concludes with a careful treatment of the great migration of rural blacks to the urban north and then an analysis of the freedom struggles of the later 20th century.

    HIS 310 U.S. Women’s History (3)
    A chronological survey of U.S. women’s history from the 17th to the 20th century. Primary themes throughout the course include work and family, class and race, public and private, and religion and politics. Examines how women’s history and status have been defined by these categories, and how each has changed over time and differed for women from diverse cultures and communities.

    HIS 350 Research Seminar (4)
    A course providing practice in research and writing using primary source materials. The course will focus on research methodology and the preparation of a seminar paper. A common theme in either American or European history will be selected each year and individual student research findings shared. For juniors and seniors. Topic alternates between American and European history. May be taken more than once with different topics.

    HIS 380 History Internship (2-4)
    A supervised work/study experience with a historical society, museum, archives or other institution providing an opportunity to apply classroom learning through research, planning exhibits, organizing collections or other "public history" activities.

    HIS 390 Independent Study in History (1-4)
    By arrangement; topic to be proposed by the student.

    See Humanities course descriptions for more European History courses.

    Political Science
    PLS 215 Introduction to Politics (3)
    The scope and methods of the study of political science. An examination of the basic concepts and theories in the discipline. Traditions and approaches in the field and their application to the various subdivisions of political science. Intended to help develop within the student the critical ability to analyze and evaluate political issues and questions.

    PLS 251 The American Political Process (3)
    A study of the historical evolution of American political institutions. Appropriate attention will be given to the theory of American federalism, constitutional safeguards, the political role of minorities and the contemporary challenges to democratic government.

    PLS 260 Government and Politics of Northern Ireland (3)
    This course covers the background to “The Troubles,” examines Partition, significant political leaders in Irish politics, the different types of government in Ireland, Northern Ireland and Britain, the different political parties in Northern Ireland, inter-governmental relations between Britain and the Irish Republic, and relevant issues, groups, parties, and paramilitary organizations. Some sample essay questions for this course have included: Why was the Unionist government unable to resolve the political crisis in Northern Ireland between l968 and l972? Assess the record of the Anglo-Irish Agreement as a strategy for promoting political consensus in Northern Ireland. Why has there been a growth of U.S. involvement in Northern Ireland politics since l985?

    PLS 270 Political Theory (3)
    A study of the principal writings and theories of selected major political philosophers from the time of the Greek city-states to the present. Special emphasis on individualized programs of study and seminar discussions. Recommended background:
    PHI 105; PLS 215. Offered alternate years.

    PLS 272 Global Politics (3)
    A study of international nation-state behavior since World War II. The course will survey political forces that operate in the contemporary international system such as ideology, nationalism, international law and economic interests. Selected current issues in international politics will be identified for in-depth study and discussion. Such issues might include the Middle East conflict, the arms race, revolution in Central America, international development, protecting world resources, the struggle of Black Africa, nuclear proliferation and related issues. Recommended background:
    PLS 215.

    PLS 285 Comparative Politics (3)
    This is an introductory course in comparative politics, designed to introduce the student to the systematic study of nations and their political systems and to provide a solid base of information about political systems of selected countries. To develop analytical skills so that each student is able to compare any two nations with regard to political culture, political socialization, structure and institutions of government and public policy.

    PLS 301 Constitutional Law (3)
    Utilizing a variety of perspectives; and with particular attention to the growth and development of the relationship between the individual and government at the federal, state and local levels; this course offers an analysis of the historical evolution of the relationship between the states to the Bill of Rights; the impact of the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the states; a study of notable Supreme court decisions from Marbary, Madison, to the leading decisions relating to the criminal justice system. Upper level standing and
    PLS 215 recommended for registration, or by permission of instructor.

    PLS 303 Studies in Political Science (1-4)
    A specialized course of study focusing upon a significant theme or topic in political science. Topics may include Canadian or European politics, the American presidency, voting behavior, state and local government or international conflict resolution. May be taken more than once with different topics.

    PLS 390 Independent Study in Political Science (1-4)
    By arrangement. Topic to be proposed by the student.