Sociology at Bluffton College


The objectives of the Sociology major are to teach the student the nature and functions of the social order and the social process essential to personality development. By studying our complex and changing society in depth, individuals can better accept, modify or oppose social forces in the light of their own values. The Sociology major seeks to:

1) prepare the student for a career in areas involving human relations. While some Sociology courses can be helpful in any vocation, students planning their life work primarily around interaction with people might consider taking Sociology courses or majoring in the field. Vocational possibilities include a wide variety, both public and private, of social service- and social work-related environments from criminal justice to family and child welfare agencies, teaching, vocations related to the church, personnel, probation and parole, human resources, administration in business or government, social research, race relations and other social action. In some of these vocations employment may be found upon graduation from college. For others, more specialized training in graduate school is strongly urged;

2) provide information on means of social action for those whose conscience calls them to work for social justice and peaceful resolution of conflict in families and communities - local, national, international. This knowledge is of special value for those interested in civic leadership, voluntary service and church institutions; and

3) provide students opportunity to prepare for an academic career in a graduate sociology program.

Major (35 hours minimum)

Required:
SOC 152 Introduction to Sociology (3)
SOC 264 Sociological Theory (3)
SOC 362 Methods of Social Research 1 (3)
SOC 363 Methods of Social Research 2 (3)
SOC 466 Sociology Seminar (2)

Remaining 21 hours in the department or cognate disciplines may include:
CRJ 201 Introduction to the Juvenile Justice (3)
CRJ 275 Criminology (3)
FCS 100 Human Ecology (2)
PSY 184 General Statistics (3)
PSY 258 Social Psychology (3)
SOC 162 Anthropology (3)
SOC 208 Sociology of the Family (3)
SOC 230 Organizational Behavior (2-year sequence with EBA 230) (3)
SOC 242 Social Problems & Public Policy (3)
SWK 264 Human Behavior and Social Environment 2 (3)
SOC 320 Family Violence (3)
SOC 325 Race and Ethnicity in American Society: History and Current Realities (3)
SOC 335 Sociology of Religion (3)
SOC 385 Sociology Practicum (2-3)
SOC 390 Independent Study (1-3)


Minor (20 hours minimum)

SOC 152 Introduction to Sociology (3)
SOC 264 Sociological Theory (3)
SOC 362 Methods of Social Research 1 (3)
SOC 466 Sociology Seminar (2)
Remaining electives (minimum 9 hours, 3 courses) from sociology or cognate disciplines.


Courses
SOC 152 Introduction to Sociology (3)
What sociologists do and how they think; the study of the interaction of individuals and groups with their physical and social environment; consideration of basic concepts, theories and major principles of explanation used by sociologists.

SOC 162 Anthropology (3)
The comparative study of culture and the development of human beings with an emphasis on primitive societies, past and present.

SOC 208 Sociology of the Family (3)
A study of modern marriage and family institutions in the context of radical social change; topics include the social regulation of mate selection, kinship relationships and sexual behavior, evaluation of research findings and emerging trends.

SOC 230 Organizational Behavior (3)
The structure of social relationships in organizational life; common patterns in development and operation of bureaucratic systems; key theories of organization including classical theory, human resources perspectives and contingency theory; divergent viewpoints on basic processes and problems in the relationship between the individual and organizational goals; hierarchical control; information gathering; decision-making; current innovations in the organization of the professional work environment, with applications in modern industry, education, governmental and institutional life. Prerequisite: one social science course.

SOC 242 Social Problems and Public Policy (3)
An investigation into the relationship between social structure and the development of popular beliefs and social scientific theory about social problems, from social pathology to "blaming the victim" myths; special attention to conceptual materials relating to public administration, law and social research and planning. Topics include violence in American culture, criminal justice, poverty, racial and ethnic minority status and others.

SOC 264 Sociological Theory (3)
An examination of basic intellectual traditions and paradigm regarding society, including normative beliefs and values, as well as scientific theories of social relations and culture from the 18th century to the present. Emphasis on selected early and contemporary theorists. Prerequisite:
SOC 152.

SOC 320 Family Violence (3)
Violent family life has largely been hidden from public analysis. In this class we will critically examine the emergence of intimate violence as a social problem, be exposed to experiences of persons involved with family violence, explore various explanations for violence in families and analyze various prevention and policy measures. In each of these cases, attention will be paid to the impact (or non-impact) of demographic factors, such as ethnicity, race and religion, on the occurrence and effect of intimate violence.

SOC 325 Race and Ethnicity in American Society: History and Current Realities (3)
A course studying the data, causes and social patterns of differences due to race and minority status as well as the means available to achieve a less-prejudiced social order. Interdisciplinary sources will be used. Prerequisite:
SOC 152.

SOC 335 Sociology of Religion (3)
Social and cultural interpretations of religious institutions and the relation of the social order, the changing situation of religious belief and experience, cultic expression, ecclesiastical organization, professional and lay religious roles, ethical behavior and impact of religious institutions and belief on public life. Prerequisite:
SOC 152 or PSY 110.

SOC 362 Methods of Social Research 1 (3)
The nature of the scientific method and research as applied to the analysis and interpretation of both quantitative and qualitative data. An introduction to the basic techniques of social research as well as statistics and the interpretation of research results. Use of computer-based data analysis techniques. Prerequisite:
SOC 152 or completion of the introductory course in one of the social science disciplines.

SOC 363 Methods of Social Research 2 (3)
Building upon the background and skills presented in SOC 362, this course involves the development of a social research project, data collection and preparation of research results. It allows students to design and conduct their own independent research, culminating in a required presentation of research findings. Prerequisite:
SOC 362.

SOC 385 Sociology Practicum (2-3)
A supervised work/study social science placement in a setting consistent with the student's interest and career goals. Prerequisite: junior or senior status in sociology, permission of faculty supervisor. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours with 3 hours credited to the completion of the Sociology major.

SOC 390 Independent Study (1-3)
By arrangement.

SOC 466 Sociology Seminar (3)
An examination of theoretical problems, strategies and controversies in modern approaches to intellectual and social problems in American culture; review of contemporary thinkers in light of classical theoretical statements.


Modified 10/26/00