Chemistry at Bluffton College


A student majoring in chemistry receives strong background in the core areas of chemistry: analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. Chemistry graduates have success in industry, graduate school, high school teaching, medical school, engineering school, etc.

Pre-medicine students should seek advice during their first year to decide if they should major in chemistry, biology, both or pre-medicine.

Students interested in high-school teaching must pursue a "physical science" teaching license. This license combines both chemistry and physics teaching and is the only license available for chemistry teachers in Ohio. Most students can expect to add a semester to the four-year program to meet student teaching requirements. Prospective teachers must begin the teacher-education program early by taking some education courses during the first or sophomore year. Therefore students should indicate their desire to teach to the Science Department as early as possible so they can receive advice about scheduling.

Major (52 hours)
Required chemistry courses:

CEM 121 General Inorganic Chemistry 1 (5)
CEM 122 General Inorganic Chemistry 2 (5)
CEM 221 Organic Chemistry 1 (4)
CEM 222 Organic Chemistry 2 (4)
CEM 230 Analytical Chemistry (4)
CEM 311 Advanced Organic Chemistry (2)
CEM 326 Physical Chemistry 1 (5)
CEM 327 Physical Chemistry 2 (5)
CEM 330 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4)
CEM 360 Instrumental Analysis (4)

Required physics courses:

PHY 211 Physics for Science and Engineering 1 (5)
PHY 212 Physics for Science and Engineering 2 (5)

In addition, students must take sufficient work in mathematics to ensure a working knowledge of differential and integral calculus. These topics usually comprise the first year of college-level calculus. Therefore all chemistry majors ought to take MAT 135 and MAT 136. Students planning careers in physical chemistry or engineering will need more math, typically MAT 225 and MAT 350.

The chemistry major at Bluffton College follows most but not all of the recommendations of the American Chemical Society. Some recommendations in addition to the courses listed above would include: MAT 225, MAT 350, CPS 108, statistics, additional advanced chemistry courses such as CEM 341 and an independent study in chemistry.

Courses
CEM 121 General Inorganic Chemistry 1 (5)
The year-long sequence CEM 121 and CEM 122 comprise the standard "freshman chemistry" course for science majors and students pursuing medicine or other health-related fields. Topics in CEM 121 include: chemical formulas and equations, stoichiometry, energy relationships, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding and properties of solids, liquids, gases and solutions. Four lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: most students will have completed high school chemistry.

CEM 122 General Inorganic Chemistry 2 (5)
The continuation of CEM 121. Topics: equilibria, acids and bases, precipitation, complex ions, qualitative analysis, rates of reactions, thermodynamics, electro-chemistry, nuclear chemistry, transition metals, nonmetals. Four lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 121.

CEM 221 Organic Chemistry 1 (4)
An overview of organic chemistry, with emphasis on nomenclature, structure-reactivity relationships and applications. The laboratory portion of the course emphasizes basic techniques of separation and analysis used in organic chemistry. Proper procedure and waste disposal will be included in the laboratory portion of the course so that the student may become familiar with standard laboratory safety practice. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 122.

CEM 222 Organic Chemistry 2 (4)
This course is more in-depth than CEM 221, concentrating on two important skills in organic chemistry: organic structure determination and basic organic synthesis, The first several weeks introduces the use of spectroscopic methods to identify organic compounds. The remainder of the course focuses on understanding organic reactions and using them to construct new molecules. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 221.

CEM 230 Analytical Chemistry (4)
Quantitative chemical analysis including acid/base, redox, precipitation and complexation equilibria in real solutions. Gravimetric, volumetric, spectroscopic and electrochemical methods are employed in the related laboratory work. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 122.

CEM 235 Cell Chemistry (4)
A study of cells including structure and function of membranes, structure and function of organelles, metabolism and energy transformations in cells, hereditary molecules, cell division, the cell cycle, cancer. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 221. This course is also listed as BIO 235.

CEM 299 Special Topics in Chemistry (credit varies)
By arrangement.

CEM 311 Advanced Organic Chemistry (2)
This course presents advanced topics in chemical bonding and reactivity, emphasizing molecular orbital theory and how it explains the relationship of molecular structure to reaction mechanism. Students will be introduced to computational chemistry as a way of solving chemical problems. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 222.

CEM 326 Physical Chemistry 1 (5)
The full-year sequence of CEM 326 and CEM 327 is a combination of physical chemistry and modern physics. Topics include thermodynamics, relativity, blackbody radiation, photoelectric effect, comptom scattering, wave nature of particles, atomic and nuclear spectroscopy, nuclear physics/chemistry, introductory quantum mechanics. Five lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites:
CEM 122, PHY 211, MAT 136 required; MAT 225 and MAT 350 recommended. Offered alternate years. This course is also listed as PHY 326.

CEM 327 Physical Chemistry 2 (5)
The continuation of CEM 326. Five lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 326. Offered alternate years. This course is also listed as PHY 327.

CEM 330 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4)
An advanced study of the chemistry of inorganic compounds with emphasis on those in the first transition metals. Lectures stress bonding theory and symmetry. Laboratory work includes synthesis and spectroscopy of transition and main group compounds. Three lectures, one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 326. Offered alternate years.

CEM 341 Biochemistry (3)
A study of the physical and chemical properties of biological compounds and their function in living systems. Topics include: protein structure, enzymology, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, lipid chemistry and molecular physiology. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 222.

CEM 360 Instrumental Analysis (4)
A study of scientific instrumentation including input transducers, linear electronics and output transducers. Students design and build simple instruments and study the design and operation of commercial instruments. Three lectures, four-hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite:
CEM 122 and PHY 212. Offered alternate years. This course is also listed as PHY 360.

CEM 390 Independent Study in Chemistry (1-3)
By arrangement. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in chemistry.

CEM 410 Seminar (2)
Chemical topics of current interest are discussed. Formal presentations by the students are required. Students not only examine the topics critically but also learn to present them in a professional manner. This course is offered on demand to seniors only.


Modified 10/5/00